sed -n '1,/regex/p' filename

print contents of file from line 1 until we match regex

Start printing the contents of filename to stdout, until a matching line to regex is found, then stop.

2
By: SuperFly
2010-07-08 19:25:59
sed

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  • Search in "filename" for the first line to match regex, and print to stdout from the matching line to the end of the file.


    1
    sed -n '/regex/,$p' filename
    SuperFly · 2010-07-08 19:24:43 0
  • Grep will read the contents of each file in PWD and will use the REs $1 $2 ... $n to match the contents. In case of match, grep will print the appropriate file, line number and the matching line. It's just easier to write ff word1 word2 word3 Instead of grep -rinE 'word1|word2|word3' . Show Sample Output


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    ff() { local IFS='|'; grep -rinE "$*" . ; }
    RanyAlbeg · 2011-06-10 10:25:10 8
  • Using perl you can search for patterns spanning several lines, a thing that grep can't do. Append the list of files to above command or pipe a file through it, just as with regular grep. If you add the 's' modifier to the regex, the dot '.' also matches line endings, useful if you don't known how many lines you need are between parts of your pattern. Change '*' to '*?' to make it greedy, that is match only as few characters as possible. See also http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1764/display-a-block-of-text-with-awk to do a similar thing with awk. Edit: The undef has to be put in a begin-block, or a match in the first line would not be found.


    7
    perl -ne 'BEGIN{undef $/}; print "$ARGV\t$.\t$1\n" if m/(first line.*\n.*second line)/mg'
    hfs · 2010-03-18 15:46:10 1
  • if you want to only print the IP address from a file. In this case the file will be called "iplist" with a line like "ip address 1.1.1.1" it will only print the "1.1.1.1" portion


    -1
    perl -wlne 'print $1 if /(([01]?\d\d?|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.([01]?\d\d?|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.([01]?\d\d?|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.([01]?\d\d?|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5]))/' iplist
    salparadise · 2009-09-17 16:14:52 0
  • If you've ever wanted to change a text files contents without having to create an intermediate file. This is it. Ex is a part of vim. The command as given will delete ALL lines containing "delete this line" from the file. More Examples: print '%s/'this is a line'/'that is not the same line'/g\nwq' | ex file.txt will substitute the first string with the second string. print '3a\n'Inserted Line'\n.\n\nwq' | ex file.txt will insert the given line after line 3. CAVEAT, Some distro's like the print command, others like echo with this command. Also note there are NO error messages on failure, at least that I've ever seen. Ex can also be quite fussy as to how it takes strings, parameters, etc... I use at&t's ksh syntax may very with other shells.


    0
    print 'g/'delete this line'/delete\nwq' | ex file.txt
    mph · 2009-07-20 19:15:29 3
  • -r to use extended regex ^ begin line | alternative get 100 or 0-9 one or two times Show Sample Output


    -1
    cat file | sed -n -r '/^100$|^[0-9]{1,2}$/p'
    voyeg3r · 2010-05-15 19:15:56 2

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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