Count the number of man pages per first character (a-z)

for i in {a..z} ; do man -k $i |grep -i "^$i" |wc | awk 'BEGIN { OFS = ":"; ORS = "" }{print $1, "\t"}' && echo $i ;done
There once was a day I needed this info.
Sample Output
302:    a
399:    b
299:    c
...

1
By: braak
2010-07-15 11:41:06

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    find . -name \*.pdf -exec pdfinfo {} \; | grep Pages | sed -e "s/Pages:\s*//g" | awk '{ sum += $1;} END { print sum; }'
    unixmonkey3987 · 2009-08-10 16:28:24 0
  • This sums up the page count of multiple pdf files without the useless use of grep and sed which other commandlinefus use. Show Sample Output


    0
    find -iname "*.pdf" -exec pdfinfo -meta {} \;|awk '{if($1=="Pages:"){s+=$2}}END{print s}'
    Barabbas · 2011-12-13 15:02:11 0
  • In this example, the command will recursively find files (-type f) under /some/path, where the path ends in .mp3, case insensitive (-iregex). It will then output a single line of output (-print0), with results terminated by a the null character (octal 000). Suitable for piping to xargs -0. This type of output avoids issues with garbage in paths, like unclosed quotes. The tr command then strips away everything but the null chars, finally piping to wc -c, to get a character count. I have found this very useful, to verify one is getting the right number of before you actually process the results through xargs or similar. Yes, one can issue the find without the -print0 and use wc -l, however if you want to be 1000% sure your find command is giving you the expected number of results, this is a simple way to check. The approach can be made in to a function and then included in .bashrc or similar. e.g. count_chars() { tr -d -c "$1" | wc -c; } In this form it provides a versatile character counter of text streams :) Show Sample Output


    1
    find /some/path -type f -and -iregex '.*\.mp3$' -and -print0 | tr -d -c '\000' |wc -c
    kyle0r · 2012-03-31 21:57:33 0
  • Useful if you don't have at hand the ability to automatically create a booklet, but still want to. F is the number of pages to print. It *must* be a multiple of 4; append extra blank pages if needed. In evince, these are the steps to print it, adapted from https://help.gnome.org/users/evince/stable/duplex-npage.html.en : 1) Click File ▸ Print. 2) Choose the General tab. Under Range, choose Pages. Type the numbers of the pages in this order (this is what this one-liner does for you): n, 1, 2, n-1, n-2, 3, 4, n-3, n-4, 5, 6, n-5, n-6, 7, 8, n-7, n-8, 9, 10, n-9, n-10, 11, 12, n-11... ...until you have typed n-number of pages. 3) Choose the Page Setup tab. - Assuming a duplex printer: Under Layout, in the Two-side menu, select Short Edge (Flip). - If you can only print on one side, you have to print twice, one for the odd pages and one for the even pages. In the Pages per side option, select 2. In the Page ordering menu, select Left to right. 4) Click Print. Show Sample Output


    1
    F=136; [[ $(($F % 4)) == 0 ]] && for i in $(seq 1 $(($F/4))); do echo -n $(($F-2*($i-1))),$((2*$i-1)),$((2*$i)),$(($F-2*$i+1)),; done | sed 's/,$/\n/' || echo "Make F a multiple of 4."
    Kayvlim · 2014-06-11 01:21:08 0

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