SSH to a machine's internet address if it is not present on your local network

ping localip -c 1 -W 1 &> /dev/null && ssh localip || ssh globalip
Ping machine once, waiting 1 second for response until failing. Upon fail, ssh globally, otherwise ssh locally.

1
By: trey
2009-02-05 10:40:26

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    -2
    for i in 192.168.1.{61..71};do ping -c 1 $i &> /dev/null && echo $i;fi;done
    AlecSchueler · 2009-08-26 06:04:24 8
  • List all the machine ip's currently running on your network Show Sample Output


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    fping -g 192.168.1.1 192.168.1.10 -r 1 | grep -v unreachable | awk '{print $1}'
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  • Einstein's razor: As simple as possible, but not simpler. On the destination machine netcat listens on any port (1234 in the example) and sends anything it receives into a file or pipe. On the source machine a separate netcat takes input from a file or pipe and sends it over the network to the listener. This is great between machines on a LAN where you don't care about authentication, encryption, or compression and I would recommend it for being simpler than anything else in this situation. Over the internet you should use something with better security.


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    (on destination machine) nc -l 1234 > whatever; (on source machine) nc destination 1234 < whatever;
    jonty · 2009-02-05 21:35:08 0
  • From 'man netstat' "netstat -i | -I interface [-abdnt] [-f address_family] [-M core] [-N system] Show the state of all network interfaces or a single interface which have been auto-configured (interfaces statically configured into a system, but not located at boot time are not shown). An asterisk (``*'') after an interface name indicates that the interface is ``down''. If -a is also present, multicast addresses currently in use are shown for each Ethernet interface and for each IP interface address. Multicast addresses are shown on separate lines following the interface address with which they are associated. If -b is also present, show the number of bytes in and out. If -d is also present, show the number of dropped packets. If -t is also present, show the contents of watchdog timers."


    -2
    netstat -an | grep -i listen
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What Others Think

+1 if you allow me I would add for i in {1..254}; do ping -c 1 -W 1 10.1.1.$i | grep 'from'; done how to find the computer turned on in your network and sudo arp-scan 192.168.1.0/24 -interface eth0 how to find the routers...
0disse0 · 365 weeks and 6 days ago

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