take a look to command before action

find /tmp -type f -printf 'rm "%p";\n'
add |sh when you agree the list, I often use that method to prevent typos in dangerous or long operations

4
By: zb
2009-02-12 20:23:24

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    -4
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What Others Think

nice
wwest4 · 488 weeks and 3 days ago

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