python -c $(echo -e 'import py_compile\npy_compile.compile("/path/to/script.py")');

Compile python script. Generated file will overwrite anything at /path/to/script.pyc


0
By: quinncom
2010-09-02 00:41:51

These Might Interest You

  • You can upload via ftp the script.sh in unix text format, and then upload a file called run.txt to execute once the script. Such script can be multiline. If the script fails a failed.txt will be generated that you can see via ftp.


    0
    watch -n10 "if test -e run.txt ; then chmod +x script.sh && ./script.sh && rm run.txt || rm run.txt && echo > failed.txt ; fi"
    bugmenot · 2012-07-29 00:38:08 1
  • Very useful for test a script. After launch this command, you only have to press ENTER for launch your script again. I work with screen and tape ENTER instead of '!!'+ENTER If you break your script with CTRL-C, it will wait for press ENTER and will re-launch You can write like it : while read -p "Press ENTER" ; do python ; done


    -2
    while read ; do python <script> ; done
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  • You have a python script that slowly prints output, you want to pipe the output to grep or tee, and you are impatient and want to watch the results right away. Rather than modify your script (making it slightly less efficient), use the -u option to have the output unbuffered.


    2
    $ python -u script.py
    recursiverse · 2010-05-20 17:53:47 0
  • This will save and execute your python script every time your press the F5 function key. It can also be added to your .vimrc: autocmd BufRead *.py nmap :w^M:!python % NOTE: the ^M is not just caret-M, it can be created by type: ctrl-v ctrl-m Show Sample Output


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    vim ... :nmap <F5> :w^M:!python %<CR>
    duxklr · 2010-09-03 18:44:21 0
  • echo "ls" > script.bash; This is my script, a simple 'ls'. gpg -c script.bash; Here I encrypt and passord-protect my script. This creates file script.bash.gpg. cat script.bash.gpg | gpg -d --no-mdc-warning | bash Here I open file script.bash.gpg, decrypt it and execute it.


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  • Sometimes you need the full path to your script, regardless of how it was executed (which starting directory) in order to maintain other relative paths in the script. If you attempt to just use something simple like: STARTING_DIR="${0%/*}" you will only get the relative path depending on where you first executed the script from. You can get the relative path to the script (from your starting point) by using dirname, but you actually have to change directories and print the working directory to get the absolute full path. Show Sample Output


    0
    STARTING_DIR=$(cd $(dirname $0) && pwd)
    bbbco · 2011-11-30 17:35:15 2

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