Execute a command with a timeout

timelimit -t100 somecommand
I found this in Ubuntu repos, and consider it better than timeout.
Sample Output
Will send a SIGHUP after 100s, then a SIGKILL if needed.
Signals and time inbetween can be changed.

-3
By: CodSpirit
2010-09-27 08:44:37

7 Alternatives + Submit Alt


  • 40
    timeout 5s COMMAND
    kev · 2011-11-19 06:14:33 2

  • 23
    timeout 10 sleep 11
    syssyphus · 2009-09-23 14:59:40 7
  • or "Execute a command with a timeout" Run a command in background, sleep 10 seconds, kill it. ! is the process id of the most recently executed background command. You can test it with: find /& sleep10; kill $!


    6
    very_long_command& sleep 10; kill $!
    dooblem · 2010-04-29 20:43:13 1
  • In this example the command "somecommand" will be executed and sent a SIGALARM signal if it runs for more than 10 seconds. It uses the perl alarm function. It's not 100% accurate on timing, but close enough. I found this really useful when executing scripts and commands that I knew might hang E.g. ones that connect to services that might not be running. Importantly this can be used within a sequential script. The command will not release control until either the command completes or the timeout is hit. Show Sample Output


    5
    perl -e "alarm 10; exec @ARGV" "somecommand"
    jgc · 2009-09-23 12:03:55 4
  • I like much more the perl solution, but without using perl. It launches a backgroup process that will kill the command if it lasts too much. A bigger function: check_with_timeout() { [ "$DEBUG" ] && set -x COMMAND=$1 TIMEOUT=$2 RET=0 # Launch command in backgroup [ ! "$DEBUG" ] && exec 6>&2 # Link file descriptor #6 with stderr. [ ! "$DEBUG" ] && exec 2> /dev/null # Send stderr to null (avoid the Terminated messages) $COMMAND 2>&1 >/dev/null & COMMAND_PID=$! [ "$DEBUG" ] && echo "Background command pid $COMMAND_PID, parent pid $$" # Timer that will kill the command if timesout sleep $TIMEOUT && ps -p $COMMAND_PID -o pid,ppid |grep $$ | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill & KILLER_PID=$! [ "$DEBUG" ] && echo "Killer command pid $KILLER_PID, parent pid $$" wait $COMMAND_PID RET=$? # Kill the killer timer [ "$DEBUG" ] && ps -e -o pid,ppid |grep $KILLER_PID | awk '{print $1}' | xargs echo "Killing processes: " ps -e -o pid,ppid |grep -v PID | grep $KILLER_PID | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill wait sleep 1 [ ! "$DEBUG" ] && exec 2>&6 6>&- # Restore stderr and close file descriptor #6. return $RET }


    4
    $COMMAND 2>&1 >/dev/null & WPID=$!; sleep $TIMEOUT && kill $! & KPID=$!; wait $WPID
    keymon · 2010-05-26 11:12:26 0

What Others Think

I think sleep is a better command for timeout option. sleep 2s && echo "hi" for 2 sec , for hours replace s by h and for min replace s by m :)
pahnin · 399 weeks and 4 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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