Make sudo forget password instantly

sudo -K
By default sudo 'remembers' password for a few minutes, so that you do not need to re-enter password for a series of sudo commands that might follow within a short time duration. However, sometime you might want sudo to instantly 'forget' the password. (Next sudo command will need you to reenter the password) Credit: I first learned this while listening to one of the 'tuxradar' podcast.
Sample Output
[does not produce any output]

17
By: b_t
2010-10-05 12:44:26

These Might Interest You

  • sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 1 sets hiberate on. sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 0 sets hibernate off. from the pmset man page: 0001 (bit 0) enables hibernation; causes OS X to write memory state to hibernation image at sleep time. On wake (without bit 1 set) OS X will resume from the hibernation image. Bit 0 set (without bit 1 set) causes OS X to write memory state and immediately hibernate at sleep time. I often change my MacBook's sleep state. So I created a function for bash to make it a little easier. Usage: hibernate (on | off) "hibernate on" will set your laptop to hibernate if the lid is closed. "hibernate off" will set your laptop to sleep if the lid is closed. ### note : "proper" indentation isn't preserved on the website function hibernate() { case "${1}" in on) sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 1 echo Hibernate mode on. ;; off) sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 0 echo Hiberate mode off. ;; *) echo "I'm sorry Dave, but I can't do that." ;; esac } To make things easier, add the proper line in your /etc/sudoers file so that your user may invoke pmset without a password. Here's how mine looks: bwayne luna = NOPASSWD: /usr/bin/pmset Don't forget that you must edit sudoers with `sudo visudo` from Terminal.app, and not by another text editor. Sorry this is so Mac OS specific. Show Sample Output


    -1
    sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 1
    thebillywayne · 2009-06-20 22:52:10 0
  • be careful where you execute this from do a 'sudo ls' beforehand to prime sudo to not ask for your password


    -2
    find . -user root | xargs sudo chown me:me
    riansanderson · 2012-04-24 18:29:13 0
  • I often forget to type sudo before a command that needs it. This is the quickest way to rerun the command prefixed by sudo.


    -15
    sudo !!
    silbermm · 2009-02-25 00:52:28 1
  • The ssh command alone will execute the sudo command remotely, but the password will be visible in the terminal as you type it. The two stty commands disable the terminal from echoing the password back to you, which makes the remote sudo act as it does locally.


    3
    stty -echo; ssh -t HOSTNAME "sudo some_command"; stty echo
    jmcantrell · 2009-03-04 19:44:36 3

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Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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