set prompt and terminal title to display hostname, user ID and pwd

export PS1='\[\e]0;\h \u \w\a\]\n\[\e[0;34m\]\u@\h \[\e[33m\]\w\[\e[0;32m\]\n\$ '
used in an if-then-else in case the default shell is ksh, not bash. The $(basename ${0#-}) is handy to echo which shell and strip the dash some flavors put in front of "bash" if [ $(basename ${0#-}) == "bash" ] ; then export PS1='\[\e]0;\h \u \w\a\]\n\[\e[0;34m\]\u@\h \[\e[33m\]\w\[\e[0;32m\]\n\$ ' else HOST=`hostname` ESC=`echo "\033"` BEL=`echo "\007"` RAW=`echo "\r"` export PS1='-${RAW}${ESC}]0;${HOST} ${USER}${BEL}-${ESC}[0;34m${USER}${ESC}[0m@${ESC}[0;34m${HOST%%.*}${ESC}[0;33m${ESC}[0m $ ' fi
Sample Output
iwtuser@sip3a /tmp
$

1
By: OS2
2009-02-13 19:49:17

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  • above line in .bash_profile will give you window title in putty or terminal client when you login to your remote server


    2
    echo -ne "\033]0;${USER}@${HOSTNAME}: ${PWD}\007"
    stinger · 2009-02-19 14:15:31 0
  • I usually have 5 or more ssh connections to various servers, and putting this command in my .bash_profile file makes my putty window or x terminal window title change to this easily recognizable and descriptive text. Includes the username, group, server hostname, where I am connecting from (for SSH tunneling), which device pts, current server load, and how many processes are running. You can also use this for your PROMPT_COMMAND variable, which updates the window title to the current values each time you exec a command. I prefix running this in my .bash_profile with [[ ! -z "$SSH_TTY" ]] && which makes sure it only does this when connecting via SSH with a TTY. Here's some rougher examples from http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html # If set, the value is executed as a command prior to issuing each primary prompt. #H=$((hostname || uname -n) 2>/dev/null | sed 1q);W=$(whoami) #export PROMPT_COMMAND='echo -ne "\033]0;${W}@${H}:${PWD/#$HOME/~} ${SSH_TTY/\/dev\//} [`uptime|sed -e "s/.*: \([^,]*\).*/\1/" -e "s/ //g"`]\007"' #PROMPT_COMMAND='echo -ne "\033]0;`id -un`:`id -gn`@`hostname||uname -n 2>/dev/null|sed 1q` `command who -m|sed -e "s%^.* \(pts/[0-9]*\).*(\(.*\))%[\1] (\2)%g"` [`uptime|sed -e "s/.*: \([^,]*\).*/\1/" -e "s/ //g"` / `command ps aux|wc -l`]\007"' #[[ -z "$SSH_TTY" ]] || export PROMPT_COMMAND #[[ -z "$SSH_TTY" ]] && [[ -f /dev/stdout ]] && SSH_TTY=/dev/stdout And here's a simple function example for setting the title: function set_window_title(){ echo -e "\033]0; ${1:-$USER@$HOST - $SHLVL} \007"; } Show Sample Output


    4
    echo -ne "\033]0;`id -un`:`id -gn`@`hostname||uname -n|sed 1q` `who -m|sed -e "s%^.* \(pts/[0-9]*\).*(\(.*\))%[\1] (\2)%g"` [`uptime|sed -e "s/.*: \([^,]*\).*/\1/" -e "s/ //g"` / `ps aux|wc -l`]\007"
    AskApache · 2009-09-19 06:57:53 1
  • This will cause bash to fix a garbled terminal before the prompt is printed. For example, if you cat a file with nonprintable character sequences, the terminal sometimes ends up in a mode where it only prints line drawing characters. This sequence will return the terminal to the standard character set after every command.


    5
    export PS1="\[\017\033[m\033[?9l\033[?1000l\]$PS1"
    cout · 2010-07-15 19:18:05 0
  • Display a passive popup during seconds. Additionnaly, --title can be used to set the title of the popup. This is a nice way to communicate with a desktop user of a machine you have an SSH access on : DISPLAY=:0 sudo -u $user -H kdialog --passivepopup "Hello you" 10 --title "cli IM"


    6
    kdialog --passivepopup <text> <timeout>
    raphink · 2009-02-16 15:09:27 1

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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