View the current number of free/used inodes in a file system

df -i <partition>
tune2fs also provides the same information . But the information does not give the current usage , it gives the information when the file system was last mounted. http://www.zaman4linux.in/2010/10/using-up-all-the-free-inodes.html
Sample Output
$ df -i /home/
Filesystem            Inodes   IUsed   IFree    IUse% Mounted on
/dev/sda6             640848   15004  625844    3%  /home

1
By: bzaman
2010-12-12 03:34:57
df

These Might Interest You


  • 3
    tree -a -L 1 --inodes /
    c0r3dump3d · 2015-06-09 17:37:37 1
  • Here we instead show a more real figure for how much free RAM you have when taking into consideration buffers that can be freed if needed. Unix machines leave data in memory but marked it free to overwrite, so using the first line from the "free" command will mostly give you back a reading showing you are almost out of memory, but in fact you are not, as the system can free up memory as soon as it is needed. I just noticed the free command is not on my OpenBSD box. Show Sample Output


    3
    free -m | awk '/buffer/ {print $4}'
    DaveQB · 2010-06-27 23:30:27 3
  • [ 2000 -ge "$(free -m | awk '/buffers.cache:/ {print $4}')" ] returns true if less than 2000 MB of RAM are available, so adjust this number to your needs. [ $(echo "$(uptime | awk '{print $10}' | sed -e 's/,$//' -e 's/,/./') >= $(grep -c ^processor /proc/cpuinfo)" | bc) -eq 1 ] returns true if the current machine load is at least equal to the number of CPUs. If either of the tests returns true we wait 10 seconds and check again. If both tests return false, i.e. 2GB are available and machine load falls below number of CPUs, we start our command and save it's output in a text file. The ( ( ... ) & ) construct lets the command run in background even if we log out. See http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3115/ .


    4
    ( ( while [ 2000 -ge "$(free -m | awk '/buffers.cache:/ {print $4}')" ] || [ $(echo "$(uptime | awk '{print $10}' | sed -e 's/,$//' -e 's/,/./') >= $(grep -c ^processor /proc/cpuinfo)" | bc) -eq 1 ]; do sleep 10; done; my-command > output.txt ) & )
    michelsberg · 2010-07-13 09:12:11 0
  • This is an useful command for when your OS is reporting less free RAM than it actually has. In case terminated processes did not free their variables correctly, the previously allocated RAM might make a bit sluggis over time. This command then creates a huge file made out of zeroes and then removes it, thus freeing the amount of memory occupied by the file in the RAM. In this example, the sequence will free up to 1GB(1M * 1K) of unused RAM. This will not free memory which is genuinely being used by active processes.


    -11
    dd if=/dev/zero of=junk bs=1M count=1K
    guedesav · 2009-11-01 23:45:51 3

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

You must be signed in to comment.

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: