Transform a portrait pdf in a landscape one with 2 pages per page

pdfnup --nup 2x1 --frame true --landscape --outfile output.pdf input.pdf
This is an example of the usage of pdfnup (you can find it in the 'pdfjam' package). With this command you can save ink/toner and paper (and thus trees!) when you print a pdf. This tools are very configurable, and you can make also 2x2, 3x2, 2x3 layouts, and more (the limit is your fantasy and the resolution of the printer :-) You must have installed pdfjam, pdflatex, and the LaTeX pdfpages package in your box.
Sample Output
          ----
  pdfjam: This is pdfjam version 2.05.
  pdfjam: Reading any site-wide or user-specific defaults...
          (none found)
  pdfjam: Effective call for this run of pdfjam:
          /usr/bin/pdfjam --suffix nup --nup '2x1' --landscape --nup '2x1' --frame 'true' --landscape --outfile output.pdf -- input.pdf - 
  pdfjam: Calling pdflatex...
  pdfjam: Finished.  Output was to 'output.pdf'.

3
By: TetsuyO
2010-12-21 14:20:06

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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