Commands to setup my new harddrive! #4 Step! Try to recover as much as possible

ddrescue -r 1 /dev/old_disk /dev/new_disk rescued.log

0
By: bbelt16ag
2011-01-08 11:22:00

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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