make ping run a little faster

alias ping='ping -n'
Sample Output
jon@realbox:~$ time ping -c 1 www.google.com.ar
PING www.l.google.com (74.125.229.52) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 74.125.229.52: icmp_req=1 ttl=52 time=221 ms

--- www.l.google.com ping statistics ---
1 packets transmitted, 1 received, 0% packet loss, time 0ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 221.896/221.896/221.896/0.000 ms

real    0m5.412s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.000s
jon@realbox:~$ alias ping='ping -n'
jon@realbox:~$ time ping -c 1 www.google.com.ar
PING www.l.google.com (74.125.229.51) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 74.125.229.51: icmp_req=1 ttl=52 time=191 ms

--- www.l.google.com ping statistics ---
1 packets transmitted, 1 received, 0% packet loss, time 0ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 191.635/191.635/191.635/0.000 ms

real    0m0.195s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.000s


-3
By: wincus
2011-01-19 23:39:21

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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