find . -printf '%d\n' | sort -n | tail -1

Find directory depth

Returns a the directory depth.

2
2011-04-25 18:38:12

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  • Based on the MrMerry one, just add some visuals and sort directory and files


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    find . -maxdepth 1 -type d|xargs du -a --max-depth=0|sort -rn|cut -d/ -f2|sed '1d'|while read i;do echo "$(du -h --max-depth=0 "$i")/";done;find . -maxdepth 1 -type f|xargs du -a|sort -rn|cut -d/ -f2|sed '$d'|while read i;do du -h "$i";done
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  • Sometimes, you don't want to just replace the spaces in the current folder, but through the whole folder tree - such as your whole music collection, perhaps. Or maybe you want to do some other renaming operation throughout a tree - this command's useful for that, too. To rename stuff through a whole directory tree, you might expect this to work: for a in `find . -name '* *'`;do mv -i "$a" ${a// /_};done No such luck. The "for" command will split its parameters on spaces unless the spaces are escaped, so given a file "foo bar", the above would not try to move the file "foo bar" to "foo_bar" but rather the file "foo" to "foo", and the file "bar" to "bar". Instead, find's -execdir and -depth arguments need to be used, to set a variable to the filename, and rename files within the directory before we rename the directory. It has to be -execdir and won't work with just -exec - that would try to rename "foo bar/baz quux" to "foo_bar/baz_quux" in one step, rather than going into "foo bar/", changing "baz quux" to "baz_quux", then stepping out and changing "foo bar/" into "foo_bar/". To rename just files, or just directories, you can put "-type f" or "-type d" after the "-depth" param. You could probably safely replace the "mv" part of the line with a "rename" command, like rename 'y/ /_/' *, but I haven't tried, since that's way less portable.


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    find . -depth -name '* *' -execdir bash \-c 'a="{}";mv -f "$a" ${a// /_}' \;
    DewiMorgan · 2012-02-28 04:03:40 1
  • Based on the MrMerry one, just add some visuals to differentiate files and directories


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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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