How to estimate the storage size of all files not named *.[extension] on the current directory

find . -maxdepth 1 -type f -not -iname '*.jpg' -ls |awk '{TOTAL+=$7} END {print int(TOTAL/(1024^2))"MB"}'
With this sentence we can estimate the storage size of all files not named *.jpg on the current directory. The syntax is based on Linux, for Unix compliance use: find ./* -prune ! -name '*.jpg' -ls |awk '{TOTAL+=$7} END {print int(TOTAL/(1024^2))"MB"}' We can change the jpg extension for whatever extension what we need
Sample Output
588MB

1
By: mack
2011-04-26 18:18:37

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What Others Think

You can do the same thing with du -hs --exclude=*.jpg That is, if you're using GNU du. If you're not using GNU du, but you are using bash, you can do it with: shopt -s extglob; du -hs !(*.jpg)
eightmillion · 373 weeks and 1 day ago
Yes I can do it with du, but, du command summarize all the files under the current path, including all sub directories. With the this find command does not.
mack · 373 weeks ago

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