Run a ext4 file system check and badblocks scan with progress info

fsck.ext4 -cDfty -C 0 /dev/sdxx
Nothing fancy, just a regular filesystem scan that calls the badblocks program and shows some progress info. The used options are: -c ? check for bad sectors with badblocks program -D ? optimize directories if possible -f ? force check, even if filesystem seems clean -t ? print timing stats (use -tt for more) -y ? assume answer ?yes? to all questions -C 0 ? print progress info to stdout /dev/sdxx ? the partition to check, (e.g. /dev/sda1 for first partition on first hard disk) NOTE: Never run fsck on a mounted partition!

10
By: mtron
2011-05-18 13:13:29

These Might Interest You

  • WARNING!!! ALL DATA WILL BE LOST!!! This command should ONLY be run on drives that are meant to be wiped. Data destruction will result from running this command with the '-w' switch. You may run this command with the '-n' switch in place of '-w' if you want to retain all data on the drive, however, the test won't be as detailed, since the '-n' switch provides a non-destructive read-write mode only, whereas '-w' switch actually writes patterns while scanning for bad blocks.


    2
    badblocks -c 65536 -o /tmp/badblocks.out -p 2 -s -v -w /dev/hdX > /tmp/badblocks.stdout 2> /tmp/badblocks.stderr
    mariusz · 2009-12-08 19:48:25 0
  • Before doing this, back-up all data on any ext3 partitions that are to be converted to ext4. After running previous command you MUST run fsck, is needed to return the filesystem to a consistent state. fsck -pDf /dev/yourpartition Edit /etc/fstab and change the 'type' from ext3 to ext4 for any partitions that are converted to ext4.


    5
    tune2fs -O extents,uninit_bg,dir_index /dev/yourpartition
    starchox · 2009-06-23 17:42:01 1
  • For slow flash memory (cheap thumb drive), ext4 is the fastest stable file system for all use cases with no relevant exception: http://www.linuxplanet.com/linuxplanet/tutorials/7208/1 Since we can usually dispense with the benefits of a journal for this type of storage, this is a way to achieve the least awful I/O-speed. Disabling the journal for an existing ext4 partition can be achieved using tune2fs -O ^has_journal /dev/sdXN Note that it is often recommended to format removable flash media with ext2, due to the lack of a journal. ext4 has many advantages over ext2 even without the journal, with much better speed as one of the consequences. So the only usecase for ext2 would be compatibility with very old software.


    2
    mke2fs -t ext4 -O ^has_journal /dev/sdXN
    michelsberg · 2013-02-15 17:24:02 0

  • 0
    /sbin/badblocks -v /dev/fd0 1440
    opexxx · 2009-09-04 09:28:52 2

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