strip ^M character from files in VI

:%s/<control-VM>//g
Files saved on a windows machine use different ascii characters for lines turns. When viewing such files in VI the will most often have a ^M(control-VM) character at the end of each line. This command will remove all occurrences of that character

-2
By: roliver
2009-02-17 01:23:39

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What Others Think

The VIM way to do this would be :e file :set fileformat=unix :w see :h file-formats for details.
bartman · 487 weeks and 4 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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