a for loop with filling 0 format, with seq

for i in `seq -f %03g 5 50 111`; do echo $i ; done
seq allows you to format the output thanks to the -f option. This is very useful if you want to rename your files to the same format in order to be able to easily sort for example: for i in `seq 1 3 10`; do touch foo$i ;done And ls foo* | sort -n foo1 foo10 foo4 foo7 But: for i in `seq -f %02g 1 3 10`; do touch foo$i ;done So ls foo* | sort -n foo01 foo04 foo07 foo10
Sample Output
$>for i in `seq -f %03g 5 50 111`; do echo $i ; done
005
055
105

4
By: lhb
2009-02-17 08:41:44

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