Echo PID of the current running command

command & echo $!
Actually $! is an internal variable containing PID of the last job in background. More info: http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/internalvariables.html#PIDVARREF Using $! for job control: possibly_hanging_job & { sleep ${TIMEOUT}; eval 'kill -9 $!' &> /dev/null; }

-2
By: Mahrud
2011-06-08 18:16:38

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    4
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    -1
    <ctrl+z> %1 &
    joem86 · 2010-10-25 17:43:38 2

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