show the working directories of running processes

lsof -bw -d cwd -a -c java
this shows the CWD of every running `java' command. YMMV but we often switch to a working directory for each service to start and run from there -- therefore this quicly shows what is running by a more meaningful name than command alone (the -bw prevents using blocking system calls which speeds this up quite a bit in the presence of remote mounted filesystems)

2
By: rgiar
2011-06-09 01:45:26

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What Others Think

useful, thanks!
0disse0 · 362 weeks and 2 days ago

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