Recover resolution when a fullscreen program crashes and you're stuck with a tiny X resolution

xrandr -s 0
This forces X back to its maximum resolution configured. To get a list, type `xrandr'.

2
By: h3xx
2011-07-24 07:38:01

These Might Interest You

  • Run a xrandr -q to get resolutions of displays. Put top resolution after --fb Divide top resolution by each display's resolution to get scale. Works for projectors, for instance.


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    xrandr --fb 1920x1080 --output LVDS1 --scale 1.5x1.35 --output HDMI1 --mode 1920x1080
    dizzi90 · 2013-10-23 22:25:30 0
  • -s must be a valid resolution. You can get a list of valid (and supported) resolutions via `xrandr`.


    4
    xrandr -s 1280x1024
    ivanatora · 2010-02-26 10:56:14 0
  • syntax for resolution is: (see "man gs" for further informations) -rnumber -rnumber1xnumber2 Show Sample Output


    2
    gs -sDEVICE=pngalpha -sOutputFile=<filename>%d.png -r<resolution> <pdffile>
    angleto · 2010-03-30 09:51:10 0
  • This command repeatedly gets the specified process' stack using pstack (which is an insanely clever and tiny wrapper for gdb) and displays it fullscreen. Since it updates every second, you rapidly get an idea of where your program is stuck or spending time. The 'tac' is used to make the output grow down, which makes it less jumpy. If the output is too big for your screen, you can always leave the 'tac' off to see the inner calls. (Or, better yet--get a bigger screen.) Caveats: Won't work with stripped binaries and probably not well with threads, but you don't want to strip your binaries or use threads anyway. Show Sample Output


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    watch -n 1 'pstack 12345 | tac'
    mkc · 2009-02-05 18:17:00 3

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