defaults write com.apple.finder NSUserKeyEquivalents -dict 'New Finder Window' '@$N' 'New Folder' '@N'; killall Finder

Remap "New Folder" to Command+N, "New Finder Window" to Cmd+Shift+N in Mac OS X

In Mac OS 9, the "New Folder" keyboard shortcut was Command+N, but in Mac OS X this was changed to "New Finder Window" instead, with "New Folder" taking the more awkward shortcut of Command+Shift+N. This command reverses their mappings.

-1
By: Vulpine
2009-02-17 23:20:53

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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