Quick network status of machine

netstat -tn | awk 'NR>2 {print $6}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn
credit to tumblr engineering blog @ http://engineering.tumblr.com/
Sample Output
 1618 ESTABLISHED
 4 LAST_ACK
 2 SYN_RECV
 1 TIME_WAIT
 1 CLOSE_WAIT

8
By: evandrix
2011-09-12 23:29:39

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  • List all the machine ip's currently running on your network Show Sample Output


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    fping -g 192.168.1.1 192.168.1.10 -r 1 | grep -v unreachable | awk '{print $1}'
    Dhinesh · 2011-11-19 09:11:56 2
  • On the another machine write this command. pv -r /dev/zero | nc 192.168.1.1 7777 It will show live throughput between two machine.The destination machine ip is at our example 192.168.1.1 You must multiply by 8 for the network calculation. You must install pv and netcat commands for this commands usage. kerim@bayner.com http://www.bayner.com/ Show Sample Output


    1
    nc -l -p 7777 > /dev/null
    kerim · 2011-01-24 00:06:45 2
  • Create an image of "device" and send it to another machine through the network ("target" and "port" sets the ip and port the stream will be sent to), outputting a progress bar On the machine that will receive, compress and store the file, use: nc -l -p <port> | 7z a <filename> -si -m0=lzma2 -mx=9 -ms=on Optionally, add the -v4g switch at the end of the line in order to split the file every 4 gigabytes (or set another size: accepted suffixes are k, m and g). The file will be compressed using 7z format, lzma2 algorithm, with maximum compression level and solid file activated. The compression stage will be executed on the machine which will store the image. It was planned this way because the processor on that machine was faster, and being on a gigabit network, transfering the uncompressed image wasn't much of a problem.


    8
    dd if=<device> | pv | nc <target> <port>
    quitaiskiluisf · 2012-01-27 18:37:36 2
  • Einstein's razor: As simple as possible, but not simpler. On the destination machine netcat listens on any port (1234 in the example) and sends anything it receives into a file or pipe. On the source machine a separate netcat takes input from a file or pipe and sends it over the network to the listener. This is great between machines on a LAN where you don't care about authentication, encryption, or compression and I would recommend it for being simpler than anything else in this situation. Over the internet you should use something with better security.


    3
    (on destination machine) nc -l 1234 > whatever; (on source machine) nc destination 1234 < whatever;
    jonty · 2009-02-05 21:35:08 0

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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