find . -iname "*.cpp" -exec perl -ni -e 'chomp; print "$_\n"' {} \;

Add a newline to the end of a cpp file

Adds a newline to the end of all cpp files in the directory to avoid warnings from gcc compiler.

0
2009-02-18 14:12:24

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What Others Think

why not just use: perl -pi -e 's:$:\n:g' (less to type)
sil · 482 weeks and 3 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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