read -d ""

Read null character seperated fields from a file

Handle any bad named file which contains ",',\n,\b,\t,` etc Store the file name as null character separated list find . -print0 >name.lst and retrieve it using read -r -d "" Eg: find . -print0 >name.lst; cat name.lst| while IFS="" read -r -d "" file; do ls -l "$file"; done
Sample Output
-rw-r--r-- 1 totti root     1 2011-10-25 23:13 a
-rw-r--r-- 1 totti root     1 2011-10-25 23:59 a?b
drwxr-xr-x 2 totti root  4096 2011-10-25 23:00 a?b?c
-rw-r--r-- 1 totti root     1 2011-10-26 00:05 a?b.cd
-rw-r--r-- 1 totti root     6 2011-10-25 23:09 a.t
drwxr-xr-x 2 totti root  4096 2011-10-26 00:11 h"i

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What do you think?

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