ddate

gag version of current date

Sample Output
$date
Thu Dec  1 18:28:51 CET 2011
$ddate
Today is Setting Orange, the 43rd day of The Aftermath in the YOLD 3177
$ddate +%.
Hail Eris, Hack Linux!
$man ddate

5
By: vlan7
2011-12-01 17:33:04

These Might Interest You

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    3
    mkdir `date --iso`
    hal · 2009-05-15 12:30:10 3
  • This version eliminates the grep before the awk, which is always good. It works for GNU core utils and ensures that the date output of ls matches the format in the pattern match, regardless of locale, etc. On BSD-based systems, you can easily eliminate both the grep and the awk: find . -maxdepth 1 -Btime -$(date +%kh%lm) -type f


    1
    ls -l --time-style=+%Y-%m-%d | awk "/$(date +'%Y-%m-%d')/ {print \$7}"
    unixmonkey11056 · 2010-07-29 05:30:29 4
  • Not a discovery but a useful one nontheless. In the above example date format is 'yyyymmdd'. For other possible formats see 'man date'. This command can be also very convenient when aliased to some meaningful name: alias mkdd='mkdir $(date +%Y%m%d)'


    11
    mkdir $(date +%Y%m%d)
    thebodzio · 2009-04-25 14:16:45 4
  • An improved version of http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1772/simple-countdown-from-a-given-date that uses Perl to pretty-print the output. Note that the GNU-style '--no-title' option has been replaced by its one-letter counterpart '-t'. Show Sample Output


    -2
    watch -tn1 'bc<<<"`date -d'\''friday 21:00'\'' +%s`-`date +%s`"|perl -ne'\''@p=gmtime($_);printf("%dd %02d:%02d:%02d\n",@p[7,2,1,0]);'\'
    penpen · 2009-03-29 19:53:36 3
  • If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command. # creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date +git-$USER@$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C 'webmaster@askapache.com' # /home/gpl/.ssh/git-gplnet@askapache.github.com-04-22-10 # create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g' <<< $PWD`.tgz) . # tar -czf /home/gpl/.backups/04-22-10-01:13-#home#gpl#.rr#src.tgz . I personally find myself having to reference date --help quite a bit as a result. So this nice alias saves me a lot of time. This is one bdash mofo. Works in sh and bash (posix), but will likely need to be changed for other shells due to the parameter substitution going on.. Just extend the sed command, I prefer sed to pretty much everything anyways.. but it's always preferable to put in the extra effort to go for as much builtin use as you can. Otherwise it's not a top one-liner, it's a lazyboy recliner. Here's the old version: alias dateh='date --help|sed "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/!d;s/ \+/ /g"|while read l;do date "+ %${l/% */}_${l/% */}_${l#* }";done|column -s_ -t' This trick from my [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html bash_profile ] Show Sample Output


    21
    alias dateh='date --help|sed -n "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/p"|while read l;do F=${l/% */}; date +%$F:"|'"'"'${F//%n/ }'"'"'|${l#* }";done|sed "s/\ *|\ */|/g" |column -s "|" -t'
    AskApache · 2010-04-21 01:22:18 5
  • Find out which RPMs were installed on a particular date. These would (naturally) include update RPMs. This example shows searching for "Thu 05 Mar" (with grep). Alternatively, pipe it to less so you can search inside less (with less's neat text highlighting of the search term): rpm -qa --queryformat '%{installtime} \"%{vendor}\" %{name}-%{version}-%{release} %{installtime:date}\n' | less # (this example) search term: Thu 05 Mar Show Sample Output


    4
    rpm -qa --queryformat '%{installtime} \"%{vendor}\" %{name}-%{version}-%{release} %{installtime:date}\n' | grep "Thu 05 Mar"
    mpb · 2009-03-17 13:38:20 1

What Others Think

That's not a "gag" date. That's the Discordian date. REF: http://www.subgenius.com/ "Malaclypse the Younger, Principia Discordia, Or How I Found Goddess And What I Did To Her When I Found Her"
SuperFly · 337 weeks and 5 days ago
This utility returns a discordian date, which is a religious thing, and it might not be a good idea to call it a gag. However, I think they do not intend this date format to be taken seriously: according to Wikipedia "Discordians use subversive humor to spread its philosophy".
dratini0 · 337 weeks and 5 days ago
I don't care about religion, so define it as you want to do. This is a technical site, simply enjoy this (I think) not so known *nix command if you didn't realize about it already.
vlan7 · 337 weeks and 5 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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