Print a file to a LPD server

rlpr -h -Plp -HIP_LPD_SERVER_HERE file.ps
You don't need cups =)
Sample Output
rlpr: warning: cannot bind to privileged port: lpd may reject
rlpr: info: 1 file spooled to lp@192.168.1.11 (proxy (none))

1
By: chilicuil
2011-12-02 00:51:16

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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