Generate White Noise

cat /dev/urandom > /dev/dsp
This command will generate white noise through your speakers (assuming you have sound enabled). It's good for staying focused, privacy, coping with tinnitus, etc. I use it to test that the sound works.

4
By: joem86
2009-02-18 21:40:29
cat

These Might Interest You

  • Substitute 'brown' with 'pink' or 'white' according to your taste. I put this on my headphones when I'm working in an "open concept" office, where there are always three to five conversations going in earshot, or if I'm working somewhere it is "rude" of me to tell a person to turn off their cubicle radio.


    3
    /usr/bin/play -q -n synth brown band -n 1200 200 tremolo 0.05 80
    Mozai · 2011-04-26 19:37:08 1
  • Plays the sound of the file, should sound like *some* kind of music, most files sound like static but some are really cool. variations: sudo cat /dev/sda > /dev/dsp sudo cat /dev/sda5 | aplay Check out http://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=70937 for more variations! semi-dupe--like http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/985/generate-white-noise but with different syntax and program. Show Sample Output


    0
    sudo cat /usr/share/icons/*/*/* > /dev/dsp
    12345678 · 2009-08-06 03:12:27 0
  • Full command: for f in input/*; do BN=$(basename "$f"); ffmpeg -i "$f" -vn "temp/$BN.flac"; sox "temp/$BN.flac" "temp/$BN-cleaned.flac" noisered profile 0.3; ffmpeg -i "$f" -vcodec copy -an "temp/$BN-na.mp4"; ffmpeg -i "temp/$BN-na.mp4" -i "temp/$BN-cleaned.flac" "output/$BN"; done This was over the 255 character limit and I didn't feel like deliberately obfuscating it. 1. Create 'input', 'output' and 'temp' directories. 2. Place the files that you want to remove the hiss/static/general noise from in the input directory. 3. Generate a noise reduction profile with sox using 'sox an_input_file.mp4 -n trim x y noiseprof profile', where x and y indicates a range in seconds that only the sound you want to eliminate is present in. 4. Run the command.


    0
    for f in input/*; do BN=$(basename "$f"); ffmpeg -i "$f" -vn "temp/$BN.flac"...
    samcamwilliams · 2015-03-01 02:48:19 0
  • Generate a truly random password using noise from your microphone to seed the RNG. This will spit out 12 password with 12 characters each, but you can save this into a bash script and replace 'pwgen -ys 12 12' with 'pwgen $@' so you can pass any paramters to pwgen as you would normally do. Show Sample Output


    1
    TMPFILE="/tmp/$RANDOM$RANDOM$RANDOM$RANDOM$RANDOM" && arecord -d 1 -t raw -f cd -q | base64 > $TMPFILE && pwgen -ys 12 12 -H $TMPFILE $@ && rm $TMPFILE
    juliohm · 2014-06-09 16:28:41 0

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

You must be signed in to comment.

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: