a function to put environment variable in zsh history for editing

function eve (); { eval "print -s ${1?no variable}=\'\$$1\'" }
This only makes sense if you are using command line editing. Create the function in your current zsh session, then type eve PATH go 'UP' in your history and notice the current (editable) definition of PATH shows up as the previous command. Same as doing: PATH="'$PATH'" but takes fewer characters and you don't have to remember the escaping.

2
By: libdave
2012-01-03 17:03:00

These Might Interest You

  • say you want to edit your PATH variable using bash/zsh commandline editing, this will put something like this in history so you can edit it: PATH=/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin to make this a shell function such that: eev HOME will put /home/dave in the last history event: eev() { print -s "$1='$(eval echo \$$1)'" }


    0
    print -s "PATH='$PATH'"
    libdave · 2009-07-15 16:38:23 0
  • eh stands for Edit History . Frequently, I'll mistype a command, and then step back through my history and correct the command. As a result, both the correct and incorrect commands are in my history file. I wanted a simple way to remove the incorrect command so I don't run it by mistake. . When running this function, first the ~/bash_history file is updated, then you edit the file in vi, and then the saved history file is loaded back into memory for current usage. . while in vi, remember that `Shift-G` sends you to the bottom of the file, and `dd` removes a line. . this command is different than bash built-in `fc` because it does not run the command after editing.


    7
    eh () { history -a ; vi ~/.bash_history ; history -r ; }
    unixmonkey8121 · 2011-03-23 18:00:20 5
  • By defining a function "gh" as shown here, it saves me typing "history | grep" every time I need to search my shell history because now I only have to type "gh". A nifty time saver :-) You can also add the "gh" function definition to your .bashrc so it is defined each time you login. (updated 2015_01_29: changed from hg to gh to avoid clash with that other hg command. mnemonic: gh = grep history) Show Sample Output


    4
    function gh () { history | grep $* ; } # gh or "grep history"
    mpb · 2014-04-02 15:17:31 4
  • wget --user=username --password="$password" http://example.org/ Instead of hiding commands entirely from history, I prefer to use "read" to put the password into a variable, and then use that variable in the commands instead of the password. Without the "-e" and "-s" it should work in any bourne-type shell, but the -s is what makes sure the password doesn't get echoed to the screen at all. (-e makes editing work a bit better)


    4
    read -e -s -p "Password: " password
    freiheit · 2010-08-18 17:53:27 1

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