Commands by Davidmal (0)

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Generate a random password 30 characters long
This command is similar to the alternate, except with head(1), you can pick as many passwords as you wish to generate by changing the number of lines you wish to preview.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Uncompress a CSS file
Ever compress a file for the web by replacing all newline characters with nothing so it makes one nice big blob? It is a great idea, however what about when you want to edit that file? ...Serious pain in the butt. I ran into this today in that my only copy of a CSS file was "compressed" with no newlines. I whipped this up and it converted back into nice human readable CSS :-) It could be nicer, but it does the job.

list files recursively by size

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Open (in vim) all modified files in a git repository
For editing files added to the index: $ vim `git diff --name-only --cached` To edit all changed files: $ vim `git diff --name-only HEAD` To edit changed files matching glob: $ vim `git diff --name-only -- '*.html'` If the commands needs to support filenames with whitespace, it gets a bit hacky (see http://superuser.com/questions/336016/invoking-vi-through-find-xargs-breaks-my-terminal-why for the reason): $ git diff --name-only -z | xargs -0 bash -c '

Stop Flash from tracking everything you do.
Brute force way to block all LSO cookies on a Linux system with the non-free Flash browser plugin. Works just fine for my needs. Enjoy.

Rip a video for archiving, from any site
Download video files from a bunch of sites (here is a list https://rg3.github.io/youtube-dl/supportedsites.html). The options say: base filename on title, ignores errors and continue partial downloads. Also, stores some metadata into a .json file plz. Paste youtube users and playlists for extra fun. Protip: git-annex loves these files


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