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Kill any process with one command using program name
Somtime one wants to kill process not by name of executable, but by a parameter name. In such cases killall is not suitable method.

Inverted cowsay
It's quite fun to invert text using "flip.pl" (ref: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2078323 ). Slightly more challenging is to flip a whole "cowsay". :-)

Recursively remove all files in a CVS directory
This will search all directories and ignore the CVS ones. Then it will search all files in the resulting directories and act on them.

Clean apt-get and gpg cache and keys
Cleans apt-get and gpg cache and keys

Rename files in batch

small CPU benchmark with PI, bc and time.
$ # 4 cores with 2500 pi digits $ CPUBENCH 4 2500 $. $ every core will use 100% cpu and you can see how fast they calculate it. $ if you do 50000 digitits and more it can take hours or days

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Scan a gz file for non-printable characters and display each line number and line that contains them.
Scans the file once to build a list of line numbers that contain non-printable characters Scans the file again, passing those line numbers to sed as two commands to print the line number and the line itself. Also passes the output through a tr to replace the characters with a ?

Ensure that each machine that you log in to has its own history file
On systems where your home directory is shared across different machines, your bash history will be global, rather than being a separate history per machine. This setting in your .bashrc file will ensure that each machine has its own history file.

Send an http HEAD request w/curl


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