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Simulate typing
This will output the characters at 10 per second.

seq (argc=2) for FreeBSD

back ssh from firewalled hosts
host B (you) redirects a modem port (62220) to his local ssh. host A is a remote machine (the ones that issues the ssh cmd). once connected port 5497 is in listening mode on host B. host B just do a ssh 127.0.0.1 -p 5497 -l user and reaches the remote host'ssh. This can be used also for vnc and so on.

display a smiling smiley if the command succeeded and a sad smiley if the command failed
you could save the code between if and fi to a shell script named smiley.sh with the first argument as and then do a smiley.sh to see if the command succeeded. a bit needless but who cares ;)

Expedient hard disk temprature and load cycle stats
This command is a great way to check to see if acpi is doing damage to your disks by agressivly parking the read arm and wearing down it's life. As you can see, mine has lost half its life. I'm sure this could be shortened though somehow. It will use smartctl to dump the stats and then grep out just the temperature and load cycles for the disk (a load cycle is when a the read arm comes out of park and wears on the drive).

convert unixtime to human-readable
Mac have direct conversion of seconds (Epoch time)

find the path of the java called from the command line
The output will likely point to '/etc/alternatives/java'. So find out where that points by issuing ls -l like this: ls -l /etc/alternatives/java

svn diff colorized
If colordiff utility installed, it is sometimes handy to call this command. Of course, you should create an alias for it. E.g. svndiff.

copy from host1 to host2, through your host
Good if only you have access to host1 and host2, but they have no access to your host (so ncat won't work) and they have no direct access to each other.

Find the package that installed a command


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