Commands by malathion (23)


  • 0
    convmv --lower --notest FILE
    malathion · 2019-08-20 05:28:08 0

  • 1
    sysctl machdep.xcpm.cpu_thermal_level
    malathion · 2019-08-19 21:15:07 0
  • pudb is an ncurses debugger. This command will allow interactive debugging of test failures in pytest using pudb.


    0
    pytest --pdbcls pudb.debugger:Debugger --pdb --capture=no
    malathion · 2019-07-14 02:54:59 0
  • jq is amazing for manipulating json on the commandline, but the developers have some weird ideas about how to handle shell redirections. This command works around them. Further reading: https://github.com/stedolan/jq/issues/1110


    3
    diff <(jq . -M -S < old.json) <(jq . -M -S < new.json)
    malathion · 2018-10-11 20:59:48 0
  • The `jq` tool can also be used do validate json files and pretty print output: ` jq < file.json` Available on several platforms, including newer debian-based systems via `#sudo apt install jq`, mac via `brew install jq`, and from source https://stedolan.github.io/jq/download/ This alternative to the original avoids the useless use of cat Show Sample Output


    1
    jq < file.json
    malathion · 2018-10-03 18:46:46 0

  • 0
    obase=16; echo "$(date +%s)" | bc | xxd -r -p | base32
    malathion · 2017-06-26 16:58:38 5

  • 1
    echo "http://commandlinefu.com" | curl -F-=\<- qrenco.de
    malathion · 2017-06-22 22:27:16 0
  • Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.


    3
    python -c "import csv,json;print json.dumps(list(csv.reader(open('csv_file.csv'))))"
    malathion · 2017-05-17 19:35:53 0

  • 5
    pip freeze --local | grep -v '^\-e' | cut -d = -f 1 | xargs -n1 pip install -U
    malathion · 2016-09-16 19:19:13 1
  • Replaces the first instance of 'foo' with 'bar'. To replace all instances of 'foo' with 'bar': !!:gs/foo/bar/


    4
    !!:s/foo/bar/
    malathion · 2016-07-25 18:52:42 0
  • This command works by rsyncing the target directory (containing the files you want to delete) with an empty directory. The '--delete' switch instructs rsync to remove files that are not present in the source directory. Since there are no files there, all the files will be deleted. I'm not clear on why it's faster than 'find -delete', but it is. Benchmarks here: https://web.archive.org/web/20130929001850/http://linuxnote.net/jianingy/en/linux/a-fast-way-to-remove-huge-number-of-files.html


    11
    rsync -a --delete empty-dir/ target-dir/
    malathion · 2016-06-07 16:56:55 1
  • If this command prints 'x' then your shell is vulnerable. Null output confirms that you are protected. Further reading: http://allanmcrae.com/2014/09/shellshock-and-arch-linux/ Show Sample Output


    3
    x="() { :; }; echo x" bash -c :
    malathion · 2014-12-08 22:21:18 0
  • echo "Hello world!" | sprunge # Redirect a stream to a pastebin sprunge ~/.bashrc # Send a file to a pastebin


    2
    sprunge() { curl -F 'sprunge=<-' http://sprunge.us < "${1:-/dev/stdin}"; }
    malathion · 2014-08-26 17:47:31 1
  • man -Pcat urxvt | sed -n '/th: b/,/^B/p'|sed '$d'|sed '/^ \{7\}[a-z]/s/^ */^/g' | sed -e :a -e 'N;s/\n/@@/g;ta;P;D' | sed 's,\^\([^@]\+\)@*[\t ]*\([^\^]\+\),! \2\n! URxvt*\1\n\n,g' | sed 's,@@\( \+\),\n\1,g' | sed 's,@*$,,g' | sed '/^[^!]/d' | tr -d "'\`" Prints a precompiled list of options to add to your Xresources. Provided by Charles Torvalds here: http://www.askapache.com/linux/rxvt-xresources.html#Output_RXVT_Resources Show Sample Output


    0
    man -Pcat urxvt | \ # see description for full command
    malathion · 2014-07-16 23:14:14 0
  • Without the bashisms and unnecessary sed dependency. Substitutions quoted so that filenames with whitespace will be handled correctly.


    4
    for file in *.pdf; do convert -verbose -colorspace RGB -resize 800 -interlace none -density 300 -quality 80 "$file" "${file//.pdf/.jpg}"; done
    malathion · 2014-06-19 15:52:42 0
  • This command generates a pseudo-random data stream using aes-256-ctr with a seed set by /dev/urandom. Redirect to a block device for secure data scrambling.


    4
    openssl enc -aes-256-ctr -pass pass:"$(dd if=/dev/urandom bs=128 count=1 2>/dev/null | base64)" -nosalt < /dev/zero > randomfile.bin
    malathion · 2014-06-02 18:12:54 1
  • Without using a pipe. -X ignores the user's .psqlrc configuration file -A sets un-aligned table output mode -t prints rows only (no headers or footers) Show Sample Output


    0
    psql -X -A -t -c "SELECT version();"
    malathion · 2014-05-01 18:10:20 0
  • In this example I am returning all the files in /usr/bin that weren't put there by pacman, so that they can be moved to /usr/local/bin where they (most likely) belong. Show Sample Output


    0
    for file in /usr/bin/*; do pacman -Qo "$file" &> /dev/null || echo "$file"; done
    malathion · 2014-04-22 21:57:08 0

  • 2
    nvidia-settings -q gpucoretemp -t | awk '{s+=$1}END{print s/NR}' RS=" "
    malathion · 2014-01-16 17:24:09 0
  • Routes curl input through a local SOCKS5 proxy; in this case, anonymizes curl activity via The Onion Router (Tor) proxy running locally. Note that the traffic will be anonymized, but it will NOT be encrypted, so your traffic will be very vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attacks. Show Sample Output


    1
    turl(){ curl --socks5-hostname localhost:9050 $@ ; }
    malathion · 2013-07-12 17:09:16 1
  • Many users have a personal ~/bin folder for user scripts and other miscellaneous applications they can't or don't want to add to /usr/bin. But this folder can get large and unwieldy. The above command adds ~/bin and all its subdirectories to the PATH environment variable so the scripts can be organized without changing .bashrc.


    -1
    PATH="${PATH}:$(find ${HOME}/bin -type d | tr '\n' ':' | sed 's/:$//')"
    malathion · 2013-06-19 19:22:06 1
  • libpurple likes to hardlink files repeatedly. To ignore libpurple, use sed: | sed '/\.\/\.purple/d' Show Sample Output


    1
    find . -type f -a \! -links 1
    malathion · 2013-05-06 20:44:08 1

  • -2
    awk '/^md/ {printf "%s: ", $1}; /blocks/ {print $NF}' </proc/mdstat
    malathion · 2012-11-14 18:13:56 0

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Open Remote Desktop (RDP) from command line having a custom screen size
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Find passwords that has been stored as plain text in NetworkManager

Get shellcode of the binary using objdump
Anyone can make the command smaller & easier? :)

Shell recorder with replay
If you provide the option -t to the script command and redirect stderr into a file, the timing information on what is going on on the terminal, is also stored. You can replay the session via the scriptreplay command, where you can also provide a speedup factor (see the man page for details). Great for demonstration purposes ...

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

analyze traffic remotely over ssh w/ wireshark
Please check out my blog article on this for more detail. http://jdubb.net/blog/2009/08/07/monitor-wireshark-capture-real-time-on-remote-host-via-ssh/

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

change exif data in all jpeg's
this takes every jpg in the current directory and changes the exif data for manufactur and model. in my case i change it to LOMO LC-A because my scanner puts his data in there :]

copy timestamps of files from one location to another - useful when file contents are already synced but timestamps are wrong.
Sometimes when copying files from one place to another, the timestamps get lost. Maybe you forgot to add a flag to preserve timestamps in your copy command. You're sure the files are exactly the same in both locations, but the timestamps of the files in the new home are wrong and you need them to match the source. Using this command, you will get a shell script (/tmp/retime.sh) than you can move to the new location and just execute - it will change the timestamps on all the files and directories to their previous values. Make sure you're in the right directory when you launch it, otherwise all the touch commands will create new zero-length files with those names. Since find's output includes "." it will also change the timestamp of the current directory. Ideally rsync would be the way to handle this - since it only sends changes by default, there would be relatively little network traffic resulting. But rsync has to read the entire file contents on both sides to be sure no bytes have changed, potentially causing a huge amount of local disk I/O on each side. This could be a problem if your files are large. My approach avoids all the comparison I/O. I've seen comments that rsync with the "--size-only" and "--times" options should do this also, but it didn't seem to do what I wanted in my test. With my approach you can review/edit the output commands before running them, so you can tell exactly what will happen. The "tee" command both displays the output on the screen for your review, AND saves it to the file /tmp/retime.sh. Credit: got this idea from Stone's answer at http://serverfault.com/questions/344731/rsync-copying-over-timestamps-only?rq=1, and combined it into one line.


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