Commands using bc (53)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Get a funny one-liner from www.onelinerz.net
Put this command in .bashrc and every time you open a new terminal a random quote will be downloaded and printed from onelinerz.net. By altering the URL in the w3m statement you can change the output: 1 to 10 lines - http://www.onelinerz.net/random-one-liners/(number)/ 20 newest lines - http://www.onelinerz.net/latest-one-liners/ Top 10 lines - http://www.onelinerz.net/top-100-funny-one-liners/ Top 10 lines are updated daily.

Convert JSON to YAML (unicode safe)
If you tried the other Python version of Convert JSON to YAML and you end up with lines that has "!!python/unicode", this version of the command is for you.

Get contents from hosts, passwd, groups even if they're in DB/LDAP/other
getent allows to get the contents of several databases in their native file format even if they are not actually in /etc. For example, if you are using a LDAP or a DB to authenticate your users, you won't find their info by catting /etc/passwd, but "getent passwd" will concatenate /etc/passwd to the LDAP/DB.

Pipe stdout and stderr, etc., to separate commands
You can use [n]> combined with >(cmd) to attach the various output file descriptors to be the input of different commands.

Ping Twitter to check if you can connect
Returns a JSON object, by connecting to the 'test' endpoint of the Twitter API. Simplest way to check if you can connect to Twitter. Output also available in XML, use '/help/test.xml' for that

search for a file in PATH

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

find the path of the java called from the command line
The output will likely point to '/etc/alternatives/java'. So find out where that points by issuing ls -l like this: ls -l /etc/alternatives/java

Search commandlinefu.com from the command line using the API
Search for one/many words on commandlinefu, results in vim for easy copy, manipulation. The -R flag is for readonly mode...you can still write to a file, but vim won't prompt for save on quit. What I'd really like is a way to do this from within vim in a new tab. Something like $ :Tex path/to/file but $ :cmdfu search terms

After typing lots of commands in windows, save them to a batch file quickly
After typing the command below, you will be greeted with nothing. press the up arrow to find the previous command you typed, press enter. repeat this as many times as you need, then hit CTRL-Z and press enter to save to the 'batchfilename.bat' file.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: