Commands using bc (51)

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Destroy all disks on system simultaneously
This command will use the fdisk utility to find all block devices on your system, and overwrite them with data from the /dev/urandom non-blocking random number generator. CAUTION: This will irrevocably erase EVERY SINGLE physical block storage device visible to the fdisk utility, including plugged USB devices, RAID sets, LVM, etc.

Convert PDF to JPG
Without the bashisms and unnecessary sed dependency. Substitutions quoted so that filenames with whitespace will be handled correctly.

power off system in X hours form the current time, here X=2

Remove a range of lines from a file
Deletes lines from START to END, inclusive. For example +4,10d will delete line 4, 5, ..., 10. Just like the vi command :4,10d does it.

Find files with lines that do not match a pattern
This one would be much faster, as it's only one executed command.

Converting video file (.flv, .avi etc.) to .3gp
ffmpeg -i = input file name -s = set frame size, qcif=176x144 -vcodec = force video codec -r = frame-rate [default = 25] -b = bit-rate [200 kb/s] -acodec = force audio codec -ab = audio bitrate in bits/s [64k] -ac = no. of audio channels [1] -ar = audio sampling frequency [44100 Hz] optional: -sameq = use same video quality as source (implies VBR) -f = force format -y = overwrite output files

Browse system RAM in a human readable form
This command lets you see and scroll through all of the strings that are stored in the RAM at any given time. Press space bar to scroll through to see more pages (or use the arrow keys etc). Sometimes if you don't save that file that you were working on or want to get back something you closed it can be found floating around in here! The awk command only shows lines that are longer than 20 characters (to avoid seeing lots of junk that probably isn't "human readable"). If you want to dump the whole thing to a file replace the final '| less' with '> memorydump'. This is great for searching through many times (and with the added bonus that it doesn't overwrite any memory...). Here's a neat example to show up conversations that were had in pidgin (will probably work after it has been closed)... $sudo cat /proc/kcore | strings | grep '([0-9]\{2\}:[0-9]\{2\}:[0-9]\{2\})' (depending on sudo settings it might be best to run $sudo su first to get to a # prompt)

A DESTRUCTIVE command to render a drive unbootable
Overwrites the boot sector. Since this doesn't overwrite any data, you can usually recover by re-creating the partition table exactly the same as before you zeroed it. This can also help sometimes if you install a new drive in a Windows machine which can't read it.

Virtualbox: setup hardware
where - memory 256 assign 256 Mb RAM - acpi on enable ACPI (mandatory if you use Winfog 2000 - ioapic off disable the IO APIC. Not useful if you use one CPU (on virtual machine or a 32 bit operative system). As ACPI, this switch is mandatory for Winbug 2000 - pae on enable the Phisical Address Extension how to use more than 4Gb of RAM on x86 CPU - hwvirtex on enables hardware virtualization extensions for microprocessors that have this feature (which should be also enabled in the BIOS of the motherboard) - nestedpaging on allows part of the processes of memory management hardware are made directly

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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