Commands using time (30)

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List the size (in human readable form) of all sub folders from the current location
Simple and easy to remember. -h is human, -d1 = depth 1. disk usage, human, depth 1

A very simple and useful stopwatch
time read -sn1 (s:silent, n:number of characters. Press any character to stop)

checking space availabe on all /proc/mounts points (using Nagios check_disk)
More info here: http://nagioswiki.com/wiki/index.php/Checking_/proc/mounts_on_remote_server

Find the package that installed a command

Pimp your less
# s = combine multiple lines of whitespace into 1 # x4 = set the tabstop to 4 instead of 8 # F = Exit if the output fits on 1 screen. This is similar to git diff # R = Raw control chars. This allows you to pipe colordiff straight to less. ie: alias sdi="svn diff | colordiff | less" # S = Chop off long lines # X = Dont send termcap init and deinit scrings to the terminal

Syntax Highlight your Perl code
This uses Text::Highlight to output the specified Perl file with syntax highlighting. A better alternative is my App::perlhl - find it on the CPAN: http://p3rl.org/App::perlhl

Show what PID is listening on port 80 on Linux

Print the IP address and the Mac address in the same line
Print the IP address and the Mac address in the same line

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Create a single-use TCP proxy with debug output to stderr
or you can add "-x" to get a typical hexdump like output


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