Commands by w00binda (9)

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Check motherboard manufacturer, product name, version and serial number
Very slick way to check your motherboard manufacturer, product name, version and serial number.

Check if filesystem hangs
When a fs hangs and you've just one console, even # ls could be a dangerous command. Simply put a trailing "&" and play safe

Shows users and 'virtual users' on your a unix-type system
Shows a list of users that currently running processes are executing as. YMMV regarding ps and it's many variants. For example, you might need: $ ps -axgu | cut -f1 -d' ' | sort -u

Unix alias for date command that lets you create timestamps in ISO 8601 format
I often need to add a timestamp to a file, but I never seem to remember the exact format string that has to be passed to the date command to get a compact datetime string like 20090220T231410 (i.e yyyymmddThhmmss, the ISO 8601 format popular outside the US)

Speed up or slow down video (and audio)
Usage: videospeed video_filename speedchange newfilename videospeed foo.mp4 0.5 foo_slow.mp4 Range of 0.5 (50%) - 2.0 (200%) is valid.

sleep for 1/10s or 1/100s or even 1/1000000s
sleep in microseconds instead of seconds Alternatively to usleep, which is not defined in POSIX 2008 (though it was defined up to POSIX 2004, and it is evidently available on Linux and other platforms with a history of POSIX compliance), the POSIX 2008 standard defines nanosleep

When was your OS installed?
shows also time if its the same year or shows year if installed before actual year and also works if /etc is a link (mac os)

Filter the output of a file continously using tail and grep
The OPs solution will work, however on some systems (bsd), grep will not filter the data, unless the --line-buffered option is enabled.

Which fonts are installed?
See all fonts installed in your system

Open (in vim) all modified files in a git repository
For editing files added to the index: $ vim `git diff --name-only --cached` To edit all changed files: $ vim `git diff --name-only HEAD` To edit changed files matching glob: $ vim `git diff --name-only -- '*.html'` If the commands needs to support filenames with whitespace, it gets a bit hacky (see http://superuser.com/questions/336016/invoking-vi-through-find-xargs-breaks-my-terminal-why for the reason): $ git diff --name-only -z | xargs -0 bash -c '


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