Commands tagged pv (37)

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Advanced ls using find to show much more detail than ls ever could
This alias is super-handy for me because it quickly shows the details of each file in the current directory. The output is nice because it is sortable, allowing you to expand this basic example to do something amazing like showing you a list of the newest files, the largest files, files with bad perms, etc.. A recursive alias would be: $ alias LSR='find -mount -printf "%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G %TF_%TR %CF_%CR %AF_%AR %#15s [%Y] %p\n" 2>/dev/null' From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Execute multiple commands from history
Assuming that 219,229 and 221 are entries in history, I recall them in a single line for execute multiple commands 219 ifdown wlan0 ... 221 ifup wlan0 ... 229 iwconfig wlan0 mode Managed so the result is execution of # ifdown wlan0 ; iwconfig wlan0 mode Managed ; ifup wlan0

Find the 10 users that take up the most disk space

Remove specific entries from iptables
Then you can remove the specific entry: iptables -D INPUT 10 Just make sure these are set: IPTABLES_SAVE_ON_STOP="yes" IPTABLES_SAVE_ON_RESTART="yes" Else your changes won't stick when you restart iptables.

Dump and bz2compress a mysql db
To also move the db backup to another location you could pass the output to the dd command instead of a file $mysqldump -u user -h host -ppwd -B dbname | bzip2 -zc9 | dd ssh [email protected] "dd of=db_dump"

commandline dictionary
Note: 1) Replace 'wonder' with any word you looking the meaning for in the above example 2) Need to install these packages: wordnet & wordnet-base (latter should be automatically installed because of dependency) 3) Combined size of packages is about 30MB on my old ubuntu system (I find it worth it)

Easily scp a file back to the host you're connecting from
Place in .bashrc and invoke like this: "mecp /path/to/file", and it will copy the specified file(s) back to the desktop of the host you're ssh'ing in from. To easily upload a file from the host you're ssh'ing in from use this: ucp (){ scp ${SSH_CLIENT%% *}:Desktop/upload/* .; }

Not a kismet replacement...
If you're like some individuals who rely on ndiswrapper and cannot use kismet, this command may be of service. watch -n .5 "iwlist wlan0 scan | egrep 'ESSID|Encryption'" Or... watch -n .5 "iwlist wlan0 scan | egrep 'ESSID|Encryption' | egrep 'linksys'" :-) Hopefully you'll find some dd-wrt compatible routers.

disable history for current shell session
this will cause any commands that you have executed in the current shell session to not be written in your bash_history file upon logout

Configure second monitor to sit to the right of laptop
You'll need to make sure your xorg.conf permits a virtual screen size this big. If it doesn't then xrandr should return a suitable error message that tells you the required size.


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