Commands by h3xx (20)

  • Real gurus don't need fancy tools like iftop or jnettop. Show Sample Output


    9
    tcpdump -w - |pv -bert >/dev/null
    h3xx · 2011-12-14 00:24:02 4
  • For when you need a quick spell check. Show Sample Output


    10
    aspell -a <<< '<WORDS>'
    h3xx · 2011-11-30 01:47:46 3
  • This causes cp to detect and omit large blocks of nulls. Sparse files are useful for implying a lot of disk space without actually having to write it all out. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sparse_file You can use it in a pipe too: dd if=/dev/zero bs=1M count=5 |cp --sparse=always /dev/stdin SPARSE_FILE Show Sample Output


    4
    cp --sparse=always <SRC> <DST>
    h3xx · 2011-09-07 08:02:50 0
  • This is shorter and actually much faster than >/dev/null (see sample output for timings) Plus, it looks like a disappointed face emoticon. Show Sample Output


    22
    <COMMAND> |:
    h3xx · 2011-08-28 23:48:29 13
  • Ever ask yourself "How much data would be lost if I pressed the reset button?" Scary, isn't it? Show Sample Output


    34
    grep ^Dirty /proc/meminfo
    h3xx · 2011-08-24 08:48:49 8
  • Tells you everything you could ever want to know about all files and subdirectories. Great for package creators. Totally secure too. On my Slackware box, this gets set upon login: LS_OPTIONS='-F -b -T 0 --color=auto' and alias ls='/bin/ls $LS_OPTIONS' which works great. Show Sample Output


    2
    lsr() { find "${@:-.}" -print0 |sort -z |xargs -0 ls $LS_OPTIONS -dla; }
    h3xx · 2011-08-15 03:10:58 0

  • 0
    echo $(($(ulimit -u)-$(pgrep -u $USER|wc -l))
    h3xx · 2011-07-30 05:03:36 0
  • These are way better than fortune(6). Show Sample Output


    2
    grep -2riP '\b(fuck|shit|bitch|tits|ass\b)' /usr/src/linux/
    h3xx · 2011-07-27 23:11:02 1
  • For instance: find . -type f -name '*.wav' -print0 |xargs -0 -P 3 -n 1 flac -V8 will encode all .wav files into FLAC in parallel. Explanation of xargs flags: -P [max-procs]: Max number of invocations to run at once. Set to 0 to run all at once [potentially dangerous re: excessive RAM usage]. -n [max-args]: Max number of arguments from the list to send to each invocation. -0: Stdin is a null-terminated list. I use xargs to build parallel-processing frameworks into my scripts like the one here: http://pastebin.com/1GvcifYa


    2
    xargs -P 3 -n 1 <COMMAND> < <FILE_LIST>
    h3xx · 2011-07-25 22:53:32 0
  • Crash Override, man! Apparently the exec call tricks BASH into setting the output buffer size to 0 under the assumption that the system (or the calling shell) will handle the output buffering. trapping the ERR signal will stop the subshell from dying and sending the ERR signal to the main script--which will terminate immediately if it does--when the program fails. The only problem is that the kernel will output a whole bunch of stack trace garbage directly to the console device once the process segfaults, so there's no way to prevent it from being output [that I know of].


    0
    (trap 'true' ERR; exec <SEGFAULT_PRONE_PROGRAM>)
    h3xx · 2011-07-25 02:30:52 0
  • Even adds a newline.


    1
    xxd -p <<< <STRING>
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 19:16:32 0

  • 0
    read VAR1 VAR2 VAR3 <<< aa bb cc; echo $VAR2
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 18:56:30 0
  • You can also save EXIF information by copying it to temp.jpg: jpegtran -optimize -outfile temp.jpg <JPEG> && jhead -te temp.jpg "$_" && mv temp.jpg "$_"


    0
    jpegtran -optimize -outfile temp.jpg <JPEG> && mv temp.jpg "$_"
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 08:55:46 0
  • Or, aumix -v -5 Map these to key combinations in your window manager and who needs special buttons?


    0
    aumix -v +5
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 07:41:40 0
  • This forces X back to its maximum resolution configured. To get a list, type `xrandr'.


    2
    xrandr -s 0
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 07:38:01 0
  • Works really well for playing DVDs, which have the volume turned way down for some reason. The `2' method is better IMHO because it will adjust to changing loud/soft parts. If you want to add it to your ~/.mplayer/config: # format: volnorm[=method:target] # method: # 1: use single sample (default) # 2: multiple samples # target: # default is 0.25 af-add=volnorm=2:0.75


    3
    mplayer -af volnorm=2:0.75 dvd://
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 07:26:51 0
  • Make sure the file contents can't be retrieved if anyone gets ahold of your physical hard drive. With hard drive partition: gpg --default-recipient-self -o /path/to/encrypted_backup.gpg -e /dev/sdb1 && shred -z /dev/sdb1 WARNING/disclaimer: Be sure you... F&%k it--just don't try this.


    0
    gpg -e --default-recipient-self <SENSITIVE_FILE> && shred -zu "$_"
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 05:51:47 0
  • Skip forward and back using the < and > keys. Display the file title with I.


    1
    mplayer -playlist <(find "$PWD" -type f)
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 03:27:03 0
  • zless /proc/config.gz


    0
    zgrep CONFIG_MAGIC_SYSRQ /proc/config.gz
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 02:06:09 0
  • This will affect all invocations of grep, even when it is called from inside a script.


    1
    export GREP_OPTIONS='--color=auto'
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 01:32:10 0

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HTTP redirect
any HTTP requests to the machine on the specified port will be redirected to http://www.whatevs.com... quick, dirty, works fine for sites w/

Block the 6700 worst spamhosts
The above url contains over 6700 of the common ad websites. The command just pastes these into your /etc/hosts.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Stream audio over ssh
This will allow you to convert an audio file to wav format, and send it via ssh to a player on the other computer, which will open and play it there. Of course, substitute your information for the sound file and remote address You do not have to use paplay on the remote end, as it is a PulseAudio thing. If the remote end uses ALSA, you should use aplay instead. If it uses OSS, you should berate them about having a lousy sound system. Also, you're not limited to transmitting encoded as wav either, it's just that AFAIK, most systems don't come with mp3 codecs, but will play wav files fine. If you know SoX is installed on the remote end and has mp3 codecs, you can use the following instead: $ cat Klaxon.mp3 |ssh thelab@company.com play -t mp3 - this will transmit as mp3. Again, use your specific information. if you're not playing mp3s, use another type with the -t option

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Send pop-up notifications on Gnome
The title is optional. Options: -t: expire time in milliseconds. -u: urgency (low, normal, critical). -i: icon path. On Debian-based systems you may need to install the 'libnotify-bin' package. Useful to advise when a wget download or a simulation ends. Example: $ wget URL ; notify-send "Done"

connects to a serial console
e.g., 'screen -L /dev/ttyUSB0 38400' listens to your Holux M-241 GPS logger and turns on automatic logging

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

create an incremental backup of a directory using hard links
dname is a directory named something like 20090803 for Aug 3, 2009. lastbackup is a soft link to the last backup made - say 20090802. $folder is the folder being backed up. Because this uses hard linking, files that already exist and haven't changed take up almost no space yet each date directory has a kind of "snapshot" of that day's files. Naturally, lastbackup needs to be updated after this operation. I must say that I can't take credit for this gem; I picked it up from somewhere on the net so long ago I don't remember where from anymore. Ah, well... Systems that are only somewhat slicker than this costs hundreds or even thousands of dollars - but we're HACKERS! We don't need no steenkin' commercial software... :)

floating point operations in shell scripts
using bc is for sissies. dc is much better :-D Polish notation will rule the world...


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