Commands by h3xx (20)

  • Real gurus don't need fancy tools like iftop or jnettop. Show Sample Output


    9
    tcpdump -w - |pv -bert >/dev/null
    h3xx · 2011-12-14 00:24:02 6
  • For when you need a quick spell check. Show Sample Output


    10
    aspell -a <<< '<WORDS>'
    h3xx · 2011-11-30 01:47:46 5
  • This causes cp to detect and omit large blocks of nulls. Sparse files are useful for implying a lot of disk space without actually having to write it all out. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sparse_file You can use it in a pipe too: dd if=/dev/zero bs=1M count=5 |cp --sparse=always /dev/stdin SPARSE_FILE Show Sample Output


    4
    cp --sparse=always <SRC> <DST>
    h3xx · 2011-09-07 08:02:50 25
  • This is shorter and actually much faster than >/dev/null (see sample output for timings) Plus, it looks like a disappointed face emoticon. Show Sample Output


    22
    <COMMAND> |:
    h3xx · 2011-08-28 23:48:29 20
  • Ever ask yourself "How much data would be lost if I pressed the reset button?" Scary, isn't it? Show Sample Output


    34
    grep ^Dirty /proc/meminfo
    h3xx · 2011-08-24 08:48:49 11
  • Tells you everything you could ever want to know about all files and subdirectories. Great for package creators. Totally secure too. On my Slackware box, this gets set upon login: LS_OPTIONS='-F -b -T 0 --color=auto' and alias ls='/bin/ls $LS_OPTIONS' which works great. Show Sample Output


    2
    lsr() { find "${@:-.}" -print0 |sort -z |xargs -0 ls $LS_OPTIONS -dla; }
    h3xx · 2011-08-15 03:10:58 2

  • 0
    echo $(($(ulimit -u)-$(pgrep -u $USER|wc -l))
    h3xx · 2011-07-30 05:03:36 2
  • These are way better than fortune(6). Show Sample Output


    2
    grep -2riP '\b(fuck|shit|bitch|tits|ass\b)' /usr/src/linux/
    h3xx · 2011-07-27 23:11:02 6
  • For instance: find . -type f -name '*.wav' -print0 |xargs -0 -P 3 -n 1 flac -V8 will encode all .wav files into FLAC in parallel. Explanation of xargs flags: -P [max-procs]: Max number of invocations to run at once. Set to 0 to run all at once [potentially dangerous re: excessive RAM usage]. -n [max-args]: Max number of arguments from the list to send to each invocation. -0: Stdin is a null-terminated list. I use xargs to build parallel-processing frameworks into my scripts like the one here: http://pastebin.com/1GvcifYa


    2
    xargs -P 3 -n 1 <COMMAND> < <FILE_LIST>
    h3xx · 2011-07-25 22:53:32 19
  • Crash Override, man! Apparently the exec call tricks BASH into setting the output buffer size to 0 under the assumption that the system (or the calling shell) will handle the output buffering. trapping the ERR signal will stop the subshell from dying and sending the ERR signal to the main script--which will terminate immediately if it does--when the program fails. The only problem is that the kernel will output a whole bunch of stack trace garbage directly to the console device once the process segfaults, so there's no way to prevent it from being output [that I know of].


    0
    (trap 'true' ERR; exec <SEGFAULT_PRONE_PROGRAM>)
    h3xx · 2011-07-25 02:30:52 3
  • Even adds a newline.


    1
    xxd -p <<< <STRING>
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 19:16:32 2

  • 0
    read VAR1 VAR2 VAR3 <<< aa bb cc; echo $VAR2
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 18:56:30 2
  • You can also save EXIF information by copying it to temp.jpg: jpegtran -optimize -outfile temp.jpg <JPEG> && jhead -te temp.jpg "$_" && mv temp.jpg "$_"


    0
    jpegtran -optimize -outfile temp.jpg <JPEG> && mv temp.jpg "$_"
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 08:55:46 2
  • Or, aumix -v -5 Map these to key combinations in your window manager and who needs special buttons?


    0
    aumix -v +5
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 07:41:40 2
  • This forces X back to its maximum resolution configured. To get a list, type `xrandr'.


    2
    xrandr -s 0
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 07:38:01 2
  • Works really well for playing DVDs, which have the volume turned way down for some reason. The `2' method is better IMHO because it will adjust to changing loud/soft parts. If you want to add it to your ~/.mplayer/config: # format: volnorm[=method:target] # method: # 1: use single sample (default) # 2: multiple samples # target: # default is 0.25 af-add=volnorm=2:0.75


    3
    mplayer -af volnorm=2:0.75 dvd://
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 07:26:51 2
  • Make sure the file contents can't be retrieved if anyone gets ahold of your physical hard drive. With hard drive partition: gpg --default-recipient-self -o /path/to/encrypted_backup.gpg -e /dev/sdb1 && shred -z /dev/sdb1 WARNING/disclaimer: Be sure you... F&%k it--just don't try this.


    0
    gpg -e --default-recipient-self <SENSITIVE_FILE> && shred -zu "$_"
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 05:51:47 2
  • Skip forward and back using the < and > keys. Display the file title with I.


    1
    mplayer -playlist <(find "$PWD" -type f)
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 03:27:03 5
  • zless /proc/config.gz


    0
    zgrep CONFIG_MAGIC_SYSRQ /proc/config.gz
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 02:06:09 2
  • This will affect all invocations of grep, even when it is called from inside a script.


    1
    export GREP_OPTIONS='--color=auto'
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 01:32:10 2

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floating point operations in shell scripts
allows you to use floating point operations in shell scripts

one-line log format for svn
the output of svn log is annoying to grep, since it spreads the useful info over multiple lines. This compacts the output down to one line so eg you can grep for a comment and see the rev, date & committer straight away. Updated: MUCH shorter, easier to remember. Now it just replaces newlines with spaces, except on '---' lines.

Run TOP in Color, split 4 ways for x seconds - the ultimate ps command. Great for init scripts
One of my favorite ways to impress newbies (and old hats) to the power of the shell, is to give them an incredibly colorful and amazing version of the top command that runs once upon login, just like running fortune on login. It's pretty sweet believe me, just add this one-liner to your ~/.bash_profile -- and of course you can set the height to be anything, from 1 line to 1000! $ G=$(stty -g);stty rows $((${LINES:-50}/2));top -n1; stty $G;unset G Doesn't take more than the below toprc file I've added below, and you get all 4 top windows showing output at the same time.. each with a different color scheme, and each showing different info. Each window would normally take up 1/4th of your screen when run like that - TOP is designed as a full screen program. But here's where you might learn something new today on this great site.. By using the stty command to change the terminals internal understanding of the size of your terminal window, you force top to also think that way as well. # save the correct settings to G var. $ G=$(stty -g) # change the number of rows to half the actual amount, or 50 otherwise $ stty rows $((${LINES:-50}/2)) # run top non-interactively for 1 second, the output stays on the screen (half at least) $ top -n1 # reset the terminal back to the correct values, and clean up after yourself $ stty $G;unset G This trick from my [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html bash_profile ], though the online version will be updated soon. Just think what else you could run like this! Note 1: I had to edit the toprc file out due to this site can't handle that (uploads/including code). So you can grab it from [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash-power-prompt.html my site ] Note 2: I had to come back and edit again because the links weren't being correctly parsed

Sync the existing directory structure to destination, without transferring any files

Fetch the current human population of Earth
Fetches the world population JSON data from the US census and parses it uses jshon

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Record MP3 audio via ALSA using ffmpeg
Record audio to an MP3 file via ALSA. Adjust -i argument according to arecord -l output.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

grep tab chars
mixing tabs and spaces for indentation in python would confuse the python interpreter, to avoid that, check if the file has any tab based indentation. "^V" => denotes press control + v and press tab within quotes. $ cat improper_indent.py class Tux(object): print "Hello world.." $ grep " " improper_indent.py print "Hello world.."

Ping Twitter to check if you can connect
Returns a JSON object, by connecting to the 'test' endpoint of the Twitter API. Simplest way to check if you can connect to Twitter. Output also available in XML, use '/help/test.xml' for that


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