(trap 'true' ERR; exec <SEGFAULT_PRONE_PROGRAM>)

Collect output from a segfaulting program and keep the script from dying

Crash Override, man! Apparently the exec call tricks BASH into setting the output buffer size to 0 under the assumption that the system (or the calling shell) will handle the output buffering. trapping the ERR signal will stop the subshell from dying and sending the ERR signal to the main script--which will terminate immediately if it does--when the program fails. The only problem is that the kernel will output a whole bunch of stack trace garbage directly to the console device once the process segfaults, so there's no way to prevent it from being output [that I know of].

0
By: h3xx
2011-07-25 02:30:52

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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