Commands tagged trap (4)

  • You can set the previous bash command as the terminal title by this command. Explanation: -trap assigns a command to execute at a given bash signal. -in the $BASH_COMMAND you find the last command -you can set the terminal title with the escape sequence: \e]0;this is the title\007 -to let the echo care about the backslashes give the -e to it Since trap is a built in bash command you find more informatin in 'man bash'for more Source: http://www.davidpashley.com/articles/xterm-titles-with-bash.html


    8
    trap 'echo -e "\e]0;$BASH_COMMAND\007"' DEBUG
    Vereb · 2009-09-29 21:09:21 18
  • Cleanly create tempfiles using mktemp and remove them using traps instead of removing them in the end of the script. This way, you make sure the tempfiles are removed properly even if the script is killed or interrupted. For a user script in KDE4, you can set TMPROOT using : TMPROOT=$(kde4-config --path tmp)


    3
    TMPROOT=/tmp; TMPDIR=$(mktemp -d $TMPROOT/somedir.XXXXXX); TMPFILE=$(mktemp $TMPROOT/somefile.XXXXXX); trap "rm -rf $TMPDIR $TMPFILE; exit" INT TERM EXIT; some treatment using $TMPDIR and $TMPFILE; exit 0
    raphink · 2009-02-24 09:35:22 6
  • Check out the usage of 'trap', you may not have seen this one much. This command provides a way to schedule commands at certain times by running them after sleep finishes sleeping. In the example 'sleep 2h' sleeps for 2 hours. What is cool about this command is that it uses the 'trap' builtin bash command to remove the SIGHUP trap that normally exits all processes started by the shell upon logout. The 'trap 1' command then restores the normal SIGHUP behaviour. It also uses the 'nice -n 19' command which causes the sleep process to be run with minimal CPU. Further, it runs all the commands within the 2nd parentheses in the background. This is sweet cuz you can fire off as many of these as you want. Very helpful for shell scripts.


    2
    ( trap '' 1; ( nice -n 19 sleep 2h && command rm -v -rf /garbage/ &>/dev/null && trap 1 ) & )
    AskApache · 2009-10-10 04:43:44 7
  • Crash Override, man! Apparently the exec call tricks BASH into setting the output buffer size to 0 under the assumption that the system (or the calling shell) will handle the output buffering. trapping the ERR signal will stop the subshell from dying and sending the ERR signal to the main script--which will terminate immediately if it does--when the program fails. The only problem is that the kernel will output a whole bunch of stack trace garbage directly to the console device once the process segfaults, so there's no way to prevent it from being output [that I know of].


    0
    (trap 'true' ERR; exec <SEGFAULT_PRONE_PROGRAM>)
    h3xx · 2011-07-25 02:30:52 5

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Remove empty directories
It only works in zsh

Search through files, ignoring .svn
By putting the "-not \( -name .svn -prune \)" in the very front of the "find" command, you eliminate the .svn directories in your find command itself. No need to grep them out. You can even create an alias for this command: $ alias svn_find="find . -not \( -name .svn -prune \)" Now you can do things like $ svn_find -mtime -3

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Unbelievable Shell Colors, Shading, Backgrounds, Effects for Non-X
I've been using linux for almost a decade and only recently discovered that most terminals like putty, xterm, xfree86, vt100, etc., support hundreds of shades of colors, backgrounds and text/terminal effects. This simply prints out a ton of them, the output is pretty amazing. If you use non-x terminals all the time like I do, it can really be helpful to know how to tweak colors and terminal capabilities. Like: $ echo $'\33[H\33[2J'

Recursively list all of the files in a directory, group them by extension and calculate the average of the file sizes in each group
Here's an annotated version of the command, using full-names instead of aliases. It is exactly equivalent to the short-hand version. # Recursively list all the files in the current directory. Get-ChildItem -Recurse | # Filter out the sub-directories themselves. Where-Object { return -not $_.PsIsContainer; } | # Group the resulting files by their extensions. Group-Object Extension | # Pluck the Name and Count properties of each group and define # a custom expression that calculates the average of the sizes # of the files in that group. # The back-tick is a line-continuation character. Select-Object ` Name, Count, @{ Name = 'Average'; Expression = { # Average the Length (sizes) of the files in the current group. return ($_.Group | Measure-Object -Average Length).Average; } } | # Format the results in a tabular view, automatically adjusted to # widths of the values in the columns. Format-Table -AutoSize ` @{ # Rename the Name property to something more sensible. Name = 'Extension'; Expression = { return $_.Name; } }, Count, @{ # Format the Average property to display KB instead of bytes # and use a formatting string to show it rounded to two decimals. Name = 'Average Size (KB)'; # The "1KB" is a built-in constant which is equal to 1024. Expression = { return $_.Average / 1KB }; FormatString = '{0:N2}' }

share internet connection with only one network interface
the below command create a alias for share your internet connection with another. $ifconfig eth0:1 192.168.0.1/24 Its obviously necessary too activate the iptables post-routing and ip forwarding, as root: $modprobe iptable_nat $iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth0 -j MASQUERADE $echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward Be sure that the alias 192.168.0.0/24 is not your active real ip range

Create a new file

Timer with sound alarm
I'd prefer this one, you have to install espeak to get this running

Download all PDFs from an authenificated website
Replace *** with the appropiate values

This command can be used to extract the IP address of the network.
can be used within a script to configure iptables for example: iface=$2 inet_ip=`ifconfig "$iface" | grep inet | cut -d: -f2 | cut -d ' ' -f1` ipt="sudo /sbin/iptables" ......................... ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- $ipt -A INPUT -i $iface ! -f -p tcp -s $UL -d $inet_ip --sport 1023: --dport 3306 -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- $ipt -A OUTPUT -o $iface -p tcp -s $inet_ip -d $UL --sport 3306 --dport 1023: -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


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