Commands by raphink (31)

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Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Prevent shell autologout
Unset TMOUT or set it to 0 in order to prevent shell autologout. TMOUT is the number of seconds after which the present shell will be killed if it has been idle for that long.

a function to find the fastest free DNS server
Evoke from the command like as: $ timeDNS commandlinefu.com . This isn't too terribly practical, but it is a good code example of using subshells to run the queries in parallel and the use of an "anonymous function" (a/k/a "inline group") to group i/o. . I'm assuming you have already defined your local DNS cache as ${local_DNS}, (here, it's 192.168.0.1). . You do need to install `moreutils` to get `sponge`. . If you're willing to wait, a slower version w/o sponge, (and w/o sorting), is this: . DNS () { for x in "192.168.0.1" "208.67.222.222" "208.67.220.220" "198.153.192.1" "198.153.194.1" "156.154.70.1" "156.154.71.1" "8.8.8.8" "8.8.4.4"; do (echo -n "$x "; dig @"$x" "$*"|grep Query) ; done ; }

Happy Days
AFAIR this is the wording ;)

Use top to monitor only all processes with the same name fragment 'foo'
$ pgrep foo may return several pids for process foobar footy01 etc. like this: 11427 12576 12577 sed puts "-p " in front and we pass a list to top: $ top -p 11427 -p 12576 -p 12577

A signal trap that logs when your script was killed and what other processes were running at that time
trap is the bash builtin that allows you to execute commands when the current script receives a particular signal. Uses $0 for the script name, $$ for the script PID, tee to output to STDOUT as well as a log file and ps to log other running processes.

Join the content of a bash array with commas
This type of join is clearly documented in the bash manual. Only the first character of IFS is used for the delimiter.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Top 15 processes with the largest number of open files
See the summary.

100% rollback files to a specific revision


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