Commands by raphink (31)

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commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

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Go up multiple levels of directories quickly and easily.

mirrors directory to a ftp server
http://lftp.yar.ru/

View the newest xkcd comic.

World Cup Live Score
World Cup Live Score of the ongoing match. Alternative to have the live score with the match statistics: $ watch -n10 --no-title "w3m http://www.livescore.com/ |awk '/live [0-9H]+[^ ]/,/red cards/'"

Emergency Alien Invasion Warning
When aliens invade Earth, be first to warn your neighbours by placing your computer screen at a window and executing this potentially Earth-saving command. Ctrl C when aliens are defeated.

Backup with versioning
Apart from an exact copy of your recent contents, also keep all earlier versions of files and folders that were modified or deleted. Inspired by the excellent EVACopy http://evacopy.sourceforge.net

Stat each file in a directory
This will run stat on each file in the directory.

Fastest segmented parallel sync of a remote directory over ssh
Mirror a remote directory using some tricks to maximize network speed. lftp:: coolest file transfer tool ever -u: username and password (pwd is merely a placeholder if you have ~/.ssh/id_rsa) -e: execute internal lftp commands set sftp:connect-program: use some specific command instead of plain ssh ssh:: -a -x -T: disable useless things -c arcfour: use the most efficient cipher specification -o Compression=no: disable compression to save CPU mirror: copy remote dir subtree to local dir -v: be verbose (cool progress bar and speed meter, one for each file in parallel) -c: continue interrupted file transfers if possible --loop: repeat mirror until no differences found --use-pget-n=3: transfer each file with 3 independent parallel TCP connections -P 2: transfer 2 files in parallel (totalling 6 TCP connections) sftp://remotehost:22: use sftp protocol on port 22 (you can give any other port if appropriate) You can play with values for --use-pget-n and/or -P to achieve maximum speed depending on the particular network. If the files are compressible removing "-o Compression=n" can be beneficial. Better create an alias for the command.

save date and time for each command in history
Date-time format: YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS

Make vim open in tabs by default (save to .profile)
I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.


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