Commands using cat (503)

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Resume an emerge, and keep all object files that are already built
For Gentoo: If you do not use this command, portage will fetch the source again, and rebuild the hole application from the top. This command make portage keep all files that ar allready built

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Find artist and title of a music cd, UPC code given (first result only)
I like curl better than wget, I just think that curl -s is a lot simpler than wget ... see I forget what you even have to do to get wget to pipe it's output Anyway, all in one sed command as "requested"

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

View all date formats, Quick Reference Help Alias
If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command. # creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com $ ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date +git-$USER@$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C 'webmaster@askapache.com' $ # /home/gpl/.ssh/git-gplnet@askapache.github.com-04-22-10 # create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory $ tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g'

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

BASH: Print shell variable into AWK

Loop over the days of a month, in $YYYY$MM$DD format
Edit YYYY and MM at the beginning of the command with the year and month you want. Note that `DD=$(printf "%02d" $d)` will pad single digit integers with a leading zero. Substitute `echo $YYYY$MM$DD` at the end of the line with the command you want to launch, for instance script.pl --yyyymmdd $YYYY$MM$DD Also available on GitHub as bash util: https://github.com/fibo/yyyymmdd

Watch the progress of 'dd'
The previously-posted one-liner didn't work for me for whatever reason, so I ended up doing this instead.

grep binary (hexadecimal) patterns
-P activates the Perl regular expression mode.


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