Commands by DEinspanjer (9)

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Normalize volume in your mp3 library
This normalizes volume in your mp3 library, but uses mp3gain's "album" mode. This applies a gain change to all files from each directory (which are presumed to be from the same album) - so their volume relative to one another is changed, while the average album volume is normalized. This is done because if one track from an album is quieter or louder than the others, it was probably meant to be that way.

Want to known what time is it in another part of the world ?
available timezone can be found in /usr/share/zoneinfo. Other examples: $ TZ=Europe/Paris date; TZ=Australia/Sydney date; TZ=America/New_York date this is based on zoneinfo files on macosx. Your mileage my vary on other unix dialects

Prints any IP out of a file

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

tcpdump from src to dst
then open with wireshark

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Umount only the NFS related to 'string'
Sometimes, you have a lot of NFS in the server and you can't or shouldn't use umount -a. Whis this command, you only umount the fs related to the 'string'

Extract audio stream from an AVI file using mencoder
This commands saves the output in the audio directory. The portion ${file/%avi/mp3} uses bash string replacement to replace the avi to mp3 within the ${file} variable.

yum -q list updates | tail -n+2

Huh? Where did all my precious space go ?
Sort ls output of all files in current directory in ascending order Just the 20 biggest ones: $ ls -la | sort -k 5bn | tail -n 20 A variant for the current directory tree with subdirectories and pretty columns is: $ find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 ls -la | sort -k 5bn | column -t And finding the subdirectories consuming the most space with displayed block size 1k: $ du -sk ./* | sort -k 1bn | column -t


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