Commands by DEinspanjer (9)

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cooking a list of numbers for calculation
When you've got a list of numbers each on its row, the ECHO command puts them on a simple line, separated by space. You can then substitute the spaces with an operator. Finally, pipe it to the BC program.

List docker volumes by container

Pretty Print a simple csv in the command line
Will handle pretty much all types of CSV Files. The ^M character is typed on the command line using Ctrl-V Ctrl-M and can be replaced with any character that does not appear inside the CSV. Tips for simpler CSV files: * If newlines are not placed within a csv cell then you can replace `map(repr, r)` with r

Replace Caps-lock with Control-key
You can return to defaults with "setxkbmap". More here: http://dailycli.blogspot.com/2009/12/xmodmap-replace-caps-lock-with-left.html

Pretty Print a simple csv in the command line
Splits the input based on commas and prints it in a nice column format. This would not work for CSV rows that have "," between quotes or with newline characters. Use only simple simple csv files.

Hypnosis
rather don't depend on those sleepin'pills http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counting_sheep

Adding Prefix to File name
Good old bracket expansion :-) For large numbers of files, "rename" will spare you the for-loop, or the find/exec...

List all files ever added in git repository

Remove invalid host keys from ~/.ssh/known_hosts
Useful if you have to tunnel ssh through a local port and it complains of the host key being different. Much easier than manually editing the file.

Execute a command with the last parameter of a previous command
Suppose that you had change in a directory like /home/user/mycode/code, and now you need to list it, instead of type entire path again, use ls !$ to recall path and list. Useful with many commands, this is only an example. (In this case, same result can be achivied with ls .)


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