Copy a file from a remote server to your local box using on-the-fly compression

rsync -Pz user@remotehost:/path/file.dat .
-P displays a progress meter -z tells rsync to use compression
Sample Output
file.dat
    40401755 100%  378.95kB/s    0:01:44 (xfer#1, to-check=0/1)

sent 43505 bytes  received 18909323 bytes  176305.38 bytes/sec
total size is 40401755  speedup is 2.13

1
2009-02-20 20:13:59

These Might Interest You

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    1
    lftp -u user,pwd -e "set sftp:connect-program 'ssh -a -x -T -c arcfour -o Compression=no'; mirror -v -c --loop --use-pget-n=3 -P 2 /remote/dir/ /local/dir/; quit" sftp://remotehost:22
    colemar · 2014-10-17 00:29:34 0
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    9
    curlftpfs ftp://YourUsername:YourPassword@YourFTPServerURL /tmp/remote-website/ && rsync -av /tmp/remote-website/* /usr/local/data_latest && umount /tmp/remote-website
    nadavkav · 2009-03-31 18:01:00 3
  • ssh from local to remote and pipe output of file to the local clipboard


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    ssh [remote-machine] "cat file" | xclip -selection c
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  • It is an easy method unzip a file and copy it to remote machine. No unziped file on local hard drive Show Sample Output


    -3
    gzip -cd file.gz | ssh user@host 'dd of=~/file'
    twfcc · 2010-09-20 11:44:19 0

What Others Think

You should use SSH for the rsync connection, and SSH on most systems will be configured to have compression enabled by default.
sud0er · 487 weeks and 2 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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