Commands using rsync (88)

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Arguments too long

Clear your history saved into .bash_history file!
Note the space before the command; that prevents your history eliminating command from being recorded. ' history -c && rm -f ~/.bash_history' Both steps are needed. 'history -c' clears what you see in the history command. 'rm -f ~/.bash_history' deletes the history file in your home directory.

Function to split a string into an array

Cancel all aptitude scheduled actions
Very handy if you have done a package selection mistake in aptitude. Note that it's better to do a Ctrl+U (undo) in aptitude if possible, because the keep-all will clear some package states (like the 'hold' state).

Function to change prompt
Bash function to change your default prompt to something simpler and restore it to normal afterwards.

VIM version 7: edit in tabs
Edit the files, each in a separate tab. use gT and gt to move to the left- and right-tab, respectively. to add another tab while editing, type ':tabe filename'

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Your GeoIP location on Google Maps

backup directory. (for bash)

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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