Commands tagged progress (28)

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Netstat Connection Check
This command does a tally of concurrent active connections from single IPs and prints out those IPs that have the most active concurrent connections. VERY useful in determining the source of a DoS or DDoS attack.

extracts 64 bytes of random digits from random lines out of /dev/random sent to stdio
Use this the next time you need to come up with a reasonably random bitstring, like for a WPA/WPA2 PSK or something. Takes a continuous stream of bytes coming from /dev/urandom, runs it through od(1), picking a random field ($0 and $1 excluded) from a random line and then prints it.

sleep for 1/10s or 1/100s or even 1/1000000s
sleep in microseconds instead of seconds Alternatively to usleep, which is not defined in POSIX 2008 (though it was defined up to POSIX 2004, and it is evidently available on Linux and other platforms with a history of POSIX compliance), the POSIX 2008 standard defines nanosleep

Remote control for Rhythmbox on an Ubuntu Media PC
Note: you'll want to set up pub-key ssh auth. Gives you a quick means of changing volume/tracks/etc for rhythmbox on a remote machine. E.g.: rc --next # Play next track rc --print-playing # Grab the name rc --volume-down rc --help

Check if filesystem hangs
When a fs hangs and you've just one console, even # ls could be a dangerous command. Simply put a trailing "&" and play safe

Generate random password on Mac OS X
Feel free to put this in your ~/.profile: $ random(){ cat /dev/urandom | env LC_CTYPE=C tr -dc $1 | head -c $2; echo; } Then use it to generate passwords: $ random [:alnum:] 16 Or DNA sequences: $ random ACGT 256

Show whats going on restoring files from a spectrum protect backup
spectrum protect's dsmc command shows file names and total amount of restore. This command shows which files are actually open and their siz in GB and highlights the change to the previous output

Monitor the queries being run by MySQL

Save a file you edited in vim without the needed permissions - (Open)solaris version with RBAC

Rename many files in directories and subdirectories
This is probably overkill, but I have some issues when the directories have spaces in their names. The $ find . -type d -print0 | while read -d $'\0' dir; do xxx; done loops over all the subdirectories in this place, ignoring the white spaces (to some extend). $ cd "$dir"; echo " process $dir"; cd -; goes to the directory and back. It also prints some info to check the progress. $ find . -maxdepth 1 -name "*.ogg.mp3" -exec rename 's/.ogg.mp3/.mp3/' {} \; renames the file within the current directory. The whole should work with directories and file names that include white spaces.


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