Commands by unixmonkey14934 (2)

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Convert PDF to JPG
Without the bashisms and unnecessary sed dependency. Substitutions quoted so that filenames with whitespace will be handled correctly.

Get the size of all the directories in current directory

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

backup your playstation game using rip

Outputs files with ascii art in the intended form.
Files containing ascii art (e.g. with .nfo extension) are typically not correctly reproduced at the command line when using cat. With iconv one can easily write a wrapper to solve this: $ #!/bin/bash $ if [ -z "[email protected]" ]; then echo "Usage: $(basename $0) file [file] ..." $ else iconv -f437 -tutf8 "[email protected]"; fi $ exit 0

Create a new file

To print a specific line from a file
Just one character longer than the sed version ('FNR==5' versus -n 5p). On my system, without using "exit" or "q", the awk version is over four times faster on a ~900K file using the following timing comparison: $ testfile="testfile"; for cmd in "awk 'FNR==20'" "sed -n '20p'"; do echo; echo $cmd; eval "$cmd $testfile"; for i in {1..3}; do time for j in {1..100}; do eval "$cmd $testfile" >/dev/null; done; done; done Adding "exit" or "q" made the difference between awk and sed negligible and produced a four-fold improvement over the awk timing without the "exit". For long files, an exit can speed things up: $ awk 'FNR==5{print;exit}'

for x in `psql -e\l | awk '{print $1}'| egrep -v "(^List|^Name|\-\-\-\-\-|^\()"`; do pg_dump -C $x | gzip > /backups/$x-back.gz
Ran as the postgres user, dumps each database individually. It dumps with the create statements as well, so you can just 'zcat $x-nightly.dmp.gz | psql' to reimport/recreate a database from a backup.

Prints per-line contribution per author for a GIT repository
Figures out total line contribution per author for an entire GIT repo. Includes binary files, which kind of mess up the true count. If crashes or takes too long, mess with the ls-file option at the start: git ls-files -x "*pdf" -x "*psd" -x "*tif" to remove really random binary files git ls-files "*.py" "*.html" "*.css" to only include specific file types Based off my original SVN version: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/2787/prints-total-line-count-contribution-per-user-for-an-svn-repository

A child process which survives the parent's death (for sure)
Test scenario: * Open xterm (or konsole, ...) * Start xeyes with: ( xeyes & ) * Close the xterminal The xeyes process should be still running.


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