Commands using kill (107)

  • this exits bash without saving the history. unlike explicitly disabling the history in some way, this works anywhere, and it works if you decide *after* issuing the command you don't want logged, that you don't want it logged ... $$ ( or ${$} ) is the pid of the current bash instance this also works perfectly in shells that don't have $$ if you do something like kill -9 `readlink /proc/self`


    29
    kill -9 $$
    stu · 2009-03-27 23:13:53 4

  • 12
    find /proc -user myuser -maxdepth 1 -type d -mtime +7 -exec basename {} \; | xargs kill -9
    sharfah · 2009-10-05 14:49:51 2

  • 12
    kill -9 -1
    cogsmos · 2010-11-08 03:28:43 2
  • It identifies the parents of the Zombie processes and kill them. So the new parent of orphan Zombies will be the Init process and he is already waiting for reaping them. Be careful! It may also kill your useful processes just because they are not taking care and waiting for their children (bad parents!). Show Sample Output


    11
    kill -9 `ps -xaw -o state -o ppid | grep Z | grep -v PID | awk '{print $2}'`
    khashmeshab · 2010-10-27 07:29:14 7
  • This command seems to achieve the similar/same goal.


    7
    kill -l
    b_t · 2010-11-17 23:48:51 0
  • I wanted to create a copy of my whole laptop disk on an lvm disk of the same size. First I created the logical volume: lvcreate -L120G -nlaptop mylvms SOURCE: dd if=/dev/sda bs=16065b | netcat ip-target 1234 TARGET: nc -l -p 1234 | dd of=/dev/mapper/mylvms-laptop bs=16065b to follow its process you issue the following command in a different terminal STATS: on target in a different terminal: watch -n60 -- kill -USR1 $(pgrep dd) (see http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/4356/output-stats-from-a-running-dd-command-to-see-its-progress)


    6
    SOURCE: dd if=/dev/sda bs=16065b | netcat ip-target 1234 TARGET: netcat -l -p 1234 | dd of=/dev/mapper/laptop bs=16065b STATS on target: watch -n60 -- kill -USR1 $(pgrep dd)
    bw · 2009-12-16 10:51:06 0
  • or "Execute a command with a timeout" Run a command in background, sleep 10 seconds, kill it. ! is the process id of the most recently executed background command. You can test it with: find /& sleep10; kill $!


    6
    very_long_command& sleep 10; kill $!
    dooblem · 2010-04-29 20:43:13 1

  • 5
    kill -9 `ps -u <username> -o "pid="`
    skye · 2009-03-23 17:51:37 4
  • Send signal 0 to the process. The return status ($?) can be used to determine if the process is running. 0 if it is, non-zero otherwise.


    5
    kill -0 [pid]
    sharfah · 2009-05-19 11:37:20 4
  • This is a more accurate way to watch the progress of a dd process. The $DDPID=$! is needed so that you don't get the PID of the sleep. The sleep 1 is needed because in my testing at least, if you run kill -USR1 against dd too quickly, it will kill it off instead of display the status. So you need to wait a second, probably so that it can configure itself to trap the USR1 signal. Show Sample Output


    4
    dd if=fromfile of=tofile & DDPID=$! ; sleep 1 ; while kill -USR1 $DDPID ; do sleep 5; done
    deltaray · 2010-01-12 15:01:44 1
  • I like much more the perl solution, but without using perl. It launches a backgroup process that will kill the command if it lasts too much. A bigger function: check_with_timeout() { [ "$DEBUG" ] && set -x COMMAND=$1 TIMEOUT=$2 RET=0 # Launch command in backgroup [ ! "$DEBUG" ] && exec 6>&2 # Link file descriptor #6 with stderr. [ ! "$DEBUG" ] && exec 2> /dev/null # Send stderr to null (avoid the Terminated messages) $COMMAND 2>&1 >/dev/null & COMMAND_PID=$! [ "$DEBUG" ] && echo "Background command pid $COMMAND_PID, parent pid $$" # Timer that will kill the command if timesout sleep $TIMEOUT && ps -p $COMMAND_PID -o pid,ppid |grep $$ | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill & KILLER_PID=$! [ "$DEBUG" ] && echo "Killer command pid $KILLER_PID, parent pid $$" wait $COMMAND_PID RET=$? # Kill the killer timer [ "$DEBUG" ] && ps -e -o pid,ppid |grep $KILLER_PID | awk '{print $1}' | xargs echo "Killing processes: " ps -e -o pid,ppid |grep -v PID | grep $KILLER_PID | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill wait sleep 1 [ ! "$DEBUG" ] && exec 2>&6 6>&- # Restore stderr and close file descriptor #6. return $RET }


    4
    $COMMAND 2>&1 >/dev/null & WPID=$!; sleep $TIMEOUT && kill $! & KPID=$!; wait $WPID
    keymon · 2010-05-26 11:12:26 0
  • Somtime one wants to kill process not by name of executable, but by a parameter name. In such cases killall is not suitable method.


    4
    kill -9 `ps ax | egrep [f]elix.jar | egrep -o -e '^ *[0-9]+'`
    yababay · 2010-09-30 16:45:47 0
  • Logs all users out except root. I changed the grep to use a regexp in case a user's username contained the word root.


    4
    who -u | grep -vE "^root " | kill `awk '{print $7}'`
    ProfessorTux · 2010-11-05 17:43:41 1
  • This is a 'killall' command equivalent where it is not available. Prior to executing it, set the environment variable USERNAME to the username, whose processes you want to kill or replace the username with the $USERNAME on the command above. Side effect: If any processes from other users, are running with a parameter of $USERNAME, they will be killed as well (assuming you are running this as root user) [-9] in square brackets at the end of the command is optional and strongly suggested to be your last resort. I do not like to use it as the killed process leaves a lot of mess behind.


    3
    ps -ef | grep $USERNAME | awk {'print $2'} | xargs kill [-9]
    TheNomad · 2009-02-17 20:35:35 1
  • Adjust "sleep X" to your needs. *NOTE: First sleep is required because bash doesn't have a "post-test" syntax (do XXX while). Show Sample Output


    3
    dd if=/path/to/inputfile of=/path/to/outputfile & pid=$! && sleep X && while kill -USR1 $pid; do sleep X; done
    cyrusza · 2010-12-02 15:07:18 3

  • 2
    for i in `ps aux | grep ssh | grep -v grep | awk {'print $2'}` ; do kill $i; done
    jcwaters · 2009-02-21 02:07:22 6

  • 2
    kill HUP `pidof '/usr/bin/X'`
    aceiro · 2010-07-16 03:55:13 1
  • This shell function takes a single argument, which is used as the base name of the .wav, .timing and .session files created. To create a screencast: screencast test type and talk ... then type 'exit' or to exit the screencast. test.wav will contain the audio from your screencast. test.session will contain text and control characters needed to paint the screen test.timing will contain timing information needed to synch individual keystrokes in test.session with the audio. to play back: aplay test.wav & scriptreplay test.{timing,session} NOTE: because the shell function uses the variable "$!", and bash likes to expand '!' during history expansion, you will need to turn off bash's history before you enter the shell function. This can be achieved using the command set +H


    2
    screencast() { arecord -R 1000 -f cd -t wav $1.wav & RECPID=$!; echo "Starting screencast in new shell. Exit subshell to quit."; script -t 2> $1.timing -a $1.session; kill $RECPID; }
    bartonski · 2011-01-20 14:35:47 0
  • Only slightly different than previous commands. The benefit is that your "watch" should die when the dd command has completed. (Of course this would depend on /proc being available)


    2
    dd if=/dev/urandom of=file.img bs=4KB& pid=$!; while [[ -d /proc/$pid ]]; do kill -USR1 $pid && sleep 1 && clear; done
    unixmonkey14934 · 2011-06-24 21:49:10 2
  • alternatively, run the spinner for 5 seconds: timeout 5 bash -c 'spinner=( Ooooo oOooo ooOoo oooOo ooooO oooOo ooOoo oOooo); while true; do for i in ${spinner[@]}; do for j in seq 0 ${#i}; do echo -en "\b\b"; done; echo -ne "${i}"; sleep 0.2; done; done' Show Sample Output


    2
    while kill -0 0; do timeout 5 bash -c 'spinner=( Ooooo oOooo ooOoo oooOo ooooO oooOo ooOoo oOooo); while true; do for i in ${spinner[@]}; do for _ in seq 0 ${#i}; do echo -en "\b\b"; done; echo -ne "${i}"; sleep 0.2; done; done'; done
    anapsix · 2015-05-07 19:13:08 2
  • Kill all processes with foo in them. Similar to pkill but more complete and also works when there is no pkill command. Works on almost every Linux/Unix platform I have tried.


    1
    ps -ef | grep [f]oo | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill -9
    eredicatorx · 2009-02-05 13:43:01 2
  • explanation: grep -- displays process ids -v -- negates the matching, displays all but what is specified in the other options -u -- specifies the user to display, or in this case negate The process loops through all PIDs that are found by pgrep, then orders a forced kill to the processes in numerical order, effectively killing the parent processes first including the shells in use which will force the users to logout. Tested on Slackware Linux 12.2 and Slackware-current


    1
    for i in $(pgrep -v -u root);do kill -9 $i;done
    lostnhell · 2009-03-24 02:54:52 2
  • USAGE: gate listening_port host port Creates listening socket and connects to remote device at host:port. It uses pipes for connection between two sockets. Traffic which goes through pipes is wrote to stdout. I use it for debug network scripts.


    1
    gate() { mkfifo /tmp/sock1 /tmp/sock2 &> /dev/null && nc -p $1 -l < /tmp/sock1 | tee /tmp/sock2 & PID=$! && nc $2 $3 < /tmp/sock2 | tee /tmp/sock1; kill -KILL $PID; rm -f /tmp/sock1 /tmp/sock2 ; }
    true · 2009-09-25 08:10:23 1
  • Add that and "cont () { ps -ec | grep $@ | kill -SIGCONT `awk '{print $1}'`; }" (without the quotes) to you bash profile and then use it to pause and resume processes safely


    1
    stop () { ps -ec | grep $@ | kill -SIGSTOP `awk '{print $1}'`; }
    iridium172 · 2009-12-27 19:40:09 4
  • Another way of counting the line output of tail over 10s not requiring pv. Cut to have the average per second rate : tail -n0 -f access.log>/tmp/tmp.log & sleep 10; kill $! ; wc -l /tmp/tmp.log | cut -c-2 You can also enclose it in a loop and send stderr to /dev/null : while true; do tail -n0 -f access.log>/tmp/tmp.log & sleep 2; kill $! ; wc -l /tmp/tmp.log | cut -c-2; done 2>/dev/null


    1
    tail -n0 -f access.log>/tmp/tmp.log & sleep 10; kill $! ; wc -l /tmp/tmp.log
    dooblem · 2010-04-29 21:23:46 0
  •  1 2 3 >  Last ›

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Have a random "cow" say a random thing
You need to have fortune and cowsay installed. It uses a subshell to list cow files in you cow directory (this folder is default for debian based systems, others might use another folder). you can add it to your .bashrc file to have it great you with something interesting every time you start a new session.

Convert seconds into minutes and seconds
This is a very simple way to input a large number of seconds and get a more useful value in minutes and seconds.

View all images
So you are in directory with loads of pictures laying around and you need to quickly scan through them all

Determine space taken by files of certain type
Just how much space are those zillions of database logs taking up ? How much will you gain on a compression rate of say 80% ? This little line gives you a good start for your calculations.

Generate a (compressed) pdf from images
use imagemagik convert

Get the IP address
gives u each configured IP in a seperate line.

Adding Color Escape Codes to global CC array for use by echo -e
I was looking for the fastest way to create a bunch of ansi escapes for use in echo -e commands throughout a lot of my shell scripts. This is what I came up with, and I actually stick that loop command in a function and then just call that at the beginning of my scripts to not clutter the environment with these escape codes, which can wreck havok on my terminal when I'm dumping the environment. More of a cool way to store escape ansi codes in an array. You can echo them like: $ echo -e "${CC[15]}This text is black on bright green background." I usually just use with a function: $ # setup_colors - Adds colors to array CC for global use $ # 30 - Black, 31 - Red, 32 - Green, 33 - Yellow, 34 - Blue, 35 - Magenta, 36 - Blue/Green, 37 - White, 30/42 - Black on Green '30\;42' $ function setup_colors(){ declare -ax CC; for i in `seq 0 7`;do ii=$(($i+7));CC[$i]="\033[1;3${i}m";CC[$ii]="\033[0;3${i}m";done;CC[15]="\033[30;42m"; export R='\033[0;00m';export X="\033[1;37m"; }; $ export -f setup_colors CC[15] has a background of bright green which is why it is separate. R resets everything, and X is my default font of bright white. $ CC[15]="\033[30;42m"; R=$'\033[0;00m'; X=$'\033[1;37m' Those are just my favorite colors that I often use in my scripts. You can test which colors by running $ for i in $(seq 0 $((${#CC[@]} - 1))); do echo -e "${CC[$i]}[$i]\n$R"; done See: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html for more usage.

Compare copies of a file with md5

Bash scripts encryption and passphrase-protection
This function will encrypt a bash script and will only execute it after providing the passphrase. Requires mcrypt to be installed on the system. $ cat hello #!/bin/bash case "$1" in ""|-h) echo "This is the fantastic Hello World. Try this:" $(basename $0) "[entity]" ;; moon) echo Good night. ;; sun) echo Good morning. ;; world) echo "Hello, world!" ;; *) echo Hi, $@. ;; esac $ scrypt hello Enter the passphrase (maximum of 512 characters) Please use a combination of upper and lower case letters and numbers. Enter passphrase: Enter passphrase: Stdin was encrypted. $ cat hello.scrypt . <(echo "$(/usr/bin/tail -n+2 $0|base64 -d|mcrypt -dq)");exit; AG0DQHJpam5kYWVsLTEyOAAgAGNiYwBtY3J5cHQtc2hhMQAV34412aaE8sRzQPQzi09YaNQPedBz aGExAARvB6A/HYValW4txoCFmrlp57lmvhKBbM4p+OUiZcCxr6Y+Mm7ogg3Y14pHi0CrfT70Tubq 9g8/kNJrQr7W/ogHpVuOOdD0YfuRatrV7W2+OlNQ63KX780g4qTHrTqNnyLp8sF5RQ7GwxyZ0Oti kROtVIU4g4+QAtn/k/e7h7yt4404VF1zzCYRSw20wmJz1o/Z0XO7E/DFBr5Bau7bWjnF7CRVtims HGrDwv1miTtAcyB9PknymDxhSyjDUdNhqXGBIioUgqjX1CKgedtO0hQp050MiQd3I6HacpSrVUIW kuuS+BtMrxHDy+48Mh1hidV5JQFP7LP5k+yAVLpeHd2m2eIT1rjVE/Bp2cQVkpODzXcWQDUAswUd vulvj/kWDQ== $ ./hello This is the fantastic Hello World. Try this: hello [entity] $ ./hello.scrypt Enter passphrase: This is the fantastic Hello World. Try this: hello.scrypt [entity] $ ./hello world Hello, world! $ ./hello.scrypt world Enter passphrase: Hello, world!

Get your Firefox history
This is the way to get access to your Firefox history...


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: