Commands by iridium172 (2)

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Stores the certificate expiration date on the variable A
Stores the certificate expiration date on the variable A

Display last exit status of a command
The variable ? contain the last exit status of a command, it can be printed for troubleshooting purpose.

Swap a file or dir with quick resotre
This lets you replace a file or directory and quickly revert if something goes wrong. For example, the current version of a website's files are in public_html. Put a new version of the site in public_html~ and execute the command. The names are swapped. If anything goes wrong, execute it again (up arrow or !!).

Create the directoty recursively

Rename files in batch

a find and replace within text-based files, to locate and rewrite text en mass.
syntax follows regular command line expression. example: let's say you have a directory (with subdirs) that has say 4000 .php files. All of these files were made via script, but uh-oh, there was a typo! if the typo is "let's go jome!" but you meant it to say "let's go home!" find . -name "*.php" | xargs perl -pi -e "s/let\'s\ go\ jome\!/let\'s\ go\ home\!/g" all better :) multiline: find . -name "*.php" | xargs perl -p0777i -e 's/knownline1\nknownline2/replaced/m' indescriminate line replace: find ./ -name '*.php' | xargs perl -pi -e 's/\".*$\"/\new\ line\ content/g'

Remove last line from files recursively
Used this command recently to remove the trailing ?> from all the files in a php project, which has having some unnecessary whitespace issues. Obviously, change *.php to whatever you'd like.

list files recursively by size

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Emergency Alien Invasion Warning
When aliens invade Earth, be first to warn your neighbours by placing your computer screen at a window and executing this potentially Earth-saving command. Ctrl C when aliens are defeated.


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