Commands using watch (154)

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Send your terminfo to another machine
I frequently use this trick to send my terminal settings to HPUX and older RHEL systems. This is due to the fact that terminfo support for rxvt-unicode (my preferred terminal app) does not exist on many older Linux and Unices.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

List status of your git repos and let us know if there is any new files to commit.
Source: http://www.bashoneliners.com/oneliners/oneliner/225/

Verify MD5SUMS but only print failures
All valid files are withheld so only failures show up. No output, all checks good.

Forward port 8888 to remote machine for SOCKS Proxy
Simply change your web browser's proxy settings to point to a SOCKS proxy at port 8888 and you're good to go.

Generate Random Passwords
If you want a password length longer than 6, changing the -c6 to read -c8 will give you 8 random characters instead of 6. To end up with a line-feed, use this with echo: # echo `< /dev/urandom tr -dc _A-Z-a-z-0-9 | head -c6` Modern systems need higher strenght, so add some special characters: # < /dev/urandom tr -dc '[email protected]#$%qwertQWERTasdfgASDFGzxcvbZXCVB' | head -c8

Get full from half remembered commands
Show all commands having the part known by you. Eg: $apropos pdf | less

Create a bash script from last commands
In order to write bash-scripts, I often do the task manually to see how it works. I type ### at the start of my session. The function fetches the commands from the last occurrence of '###', excluding the function call. You could prefix this with a here-document to have a proper script-header. Delete some lines, add a few variables and a loop, and you're ready to go. This function could probably be much shorter...

kill all running instances of wine and programs runned by it (exe)
Look mah! All pipes

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials


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