Commands by kev (116)

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commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

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Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Print trending topics on Twitter

random git-commit message
Do a git commit using a random message.

hibernate

Show number of NIC's, ports per nic and PCI address

concatenate compressed and uncompressed logs
with zcat force option it's even simpler.

view certificate details

Show highlighted text with full terminal width
Show a full terminal line inverted with custom text.

Virtualbox rsync copy (without defining any virtualbox configuration)
That is, after running `vagrant ssh-config` to determine ports and ip's: $ vagrant ssh-config Host default HostName 127.0.0.1 User vagrant Port 2200 UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null StrictHostKeyChecking no PasswordAuthentication no IdentityFile /Users/romanvg/tmp/.vagrant/machines/default/virtualbox/private_key IdentitiesOnly yes LogLevel FATAL

Securely destroy data (including whole hard disks)
GNU shred is provided by the coreutils package on most Linux distribution (meaning, you probably have it installed already), and is capable of wiping a device to DoD standards. You can give shred any file to destroy, be it your shell history or a block device file (/dev/hdX, for IDE hard drive X, for example). Shred will overwrite the target 25 times by default, but 3 is enough to prevent most recovery, and 7 passes is enough for the US Department of Defense. Use the -n flag to specify the number of passes, and man shred for even more secure erasing fun. Note that shredding your shell history may not be terribly effective on devices with journaling filesystems, RAID copies or snapshot copies, but if you're wiping a single disk, none of that is a concern. Also, it takes quite a while :)


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