Commands using seq (108)

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Monitoring file handles used by a particular process
-r : repeat mode

unbuffered python output
You have a python script that slowly prints output, you want to pipe the output to grep or tee, and you are impatient and want to watch the results right away. Rather than modify your script (making it slightly less efficient), use the -u option to have the output unbuffered.

Remove job from crontab by commandline
The "-u USER" is optional if root user is used

Change mysql prompt to be more verbose
You can put this into your shell sourced file like .bashrc or .zshrc to have a different mysql prompt. See http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/de/mysql-commands.html for more informations. Beware that currently with mysql 5.5 the seconds are buggy and won't be displayed if you put this into a .cnf file. With the enironment variable this will work.

Transfers clipboard content from one OS X machine to another
This uses ssh to transfer the contents of one Mac's clipboard to another's. This only works with plain text, sadly. Trying to transfer images will just clear out the remote machine's clipboard, and rich text will be converted to plain text. Using the "Remote Login" must be enabled on the remote machine (via System Preferences' Sharing panel) for this to work.

Generate binary sequence data

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Mac osx friendly version of this terminal typing command at 200ms per key

Show all listening and established ports TCP and UDP together with the PID of the associated process
Easy to remenber. Fot TCP only use: netstat -plant

Find the package that installed a command


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